Xian JH-7 ‘Flounder’ Walkaround

Aircraft Walkaround

The page features photographs of the JH-7As in service with the 82nd Regiment, 28th Division of the PLAAF at Jianqiao in the Nanjing Military Region.

General head-on view.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
View of aircraft 30597.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Closer head-on.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Steerable nosewheel.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Three-quarter front view.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Cockpit canopies.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Gun installation.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Ground power and centreline drop tank.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Main gear doors.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Main landing gear.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Main landing gear leg.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Twin wheels with brake pack in between.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Main landing gear bay – yellow pipes are fuel.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Forward fuselage with ground air cooling.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
800 litre drop tank.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Outboard weapons pylon.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Wingtip launch rail.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Port wing with large ailerons.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Rear fuselage.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
APU exhaust.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Three-quarters rear view.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
The grill above the engine is an airbrake.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Engine exhaust nozzles.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)
Rear view.
(photo, Mikhail Putnikov)

Xian JH-7 ‘Flounder’ Manufacture

Production Summary

JH-7As of the 82nd Regiment, 28th Air Division, PLAAF.
(photo, www.top81.cn)

Production

Serial/Code c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
081       JH-7, 1st prototype, FF 14 Dec 1988
082       JH-7, 2nd proto, w/o ? date
083       JH-7, 3rd proto, to CFTE, FBC-1 demonstrator in 1998
084       JH-7, 4th proto
085       JH-7, 5th proto
810       JH-7A proto?
811       JH-7A 1st proto, FF 1 July 2002
8812       JH-7A proto
813       JH-7A proto
21092       JH-7A, PLAAF 83rd Regt, 28th Air Div
21094       JH-7A, PLAAF 83rd Regt, 28th Air Div
30591       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30593       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30594       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30597       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30599       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30690       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30695       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
30698       JH-7A, PLAAF 82nd Regt, 28th Air Div
81662        
81669       JH-7
81760       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81761       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81762       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81763       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81764       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81765       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81766       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81767       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81768       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81769       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81860       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81861       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81862       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81863       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81864       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81865       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81866       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81867       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
81868       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 16th Bomber Regt
82064       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82065       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82067       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82068       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82069       JH-7, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82160       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82161       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82164       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82167       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
82169       JH-7, PLANAF 2nd Sqn, 17th Bomber Regt
83061        
83096       JH-7A, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 27th Bomber Regt
83097       JH-7A, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 27th Bomber Regt
83098       JH-7A, PLANAF 1st Sqn, 27th Bomber Regt
83191        
83192       JH-7A, PLANAF
83193        
86718        
         
         
         
         

Lockheed F-104 Starfighter Manufacture

Production Summary

Belgian AF TF-104G FC06 seen in April 1981.
(photo, Joop de Groot)

Production

Lockheed Aircraft Company
(Lockheed, Burbank, CA, USA.)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
XF-104 2 Burbank, CA 1953-1954
YF-104A 17 Burbank, CA Oct 1954-1956
F-104A 153 Burbank, CA 1956-Dec 1958
F-104B 26 Burbank, CA 1956-Nov 1958
F-104C 77 Burbank, CA 1958-June 1959
F-104D 21 Burbank, CA 1958-1959
F-104DJ 20 Burbank, CA 1962-1964
CF-104D 38 Burbank, CA 1961
F-104F 30 Burbank, CA 1959-1960
F-104G 139 Burbank, CA 1960-1962
RF-104G 40 Burbank, CA 1962-1963
TF-104G 220 Burbank, CA 1962-1966
F-104J 3 Burbank, CA 1961
F-104N 3 Burbank, CA 1963
Total: 741    
Canadair
(Canadair Ltd, Cartierville, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
CF-104 (1 F-104A conv) Cartierville 1961
CF-104 200 Cartierville 1961-63
F-104G 140 Cartierville 1963-64
Total: 340    

Aircraft delivered to Canada (CF-104) and Denmark (F-104G).

Fiat
(Societa Per Azioni Fiat, Turin, Italy)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-104G 164 Turin June 1962-1966
RF-104G 35 Turin 1963-1966
F-104S (2 F-104G conv) Turin 1966
F-104S 245 Turin 1968-March 1979
F-104S ASA (147 conv) Turin 1986-1992
F-104S ASA/M (49 conv) Turin 1998-2000
TF-104G ASA/M (15 conv) Turin 1998-2000
Total: 444    

Aircraft delivered to Italy, Netherlands, West Germany and Turkey.

Fokker Aircraft [ARGE Nord]
(Fokker, Schiphol, Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-104G 231 Schiphol 1961-1966
RF-104G 119 Schiphol 1962-1966
Total: 350    

Aircraft delivered to Netherlands and West Germany.

MBB
(MBB, Manching, Augsberg, West Germany)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-104G 50 Manching 1970-1972
Total: 50    

Aircraft delivered to West Germany only.

Messerchmitt [ARGE Sud]
(Messerschmitt AG, Manching, Augsberg, West Germany – later part of MBB)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-104G 210 Manching 1960-1966
Total: 210    

Aircraft delivered to West Germany only.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
(MHI, Komaki, Nagoya, Japan)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-104J 207* Komaki Apr 1962-Dec 1967
Total: 207    

*29 assembled from Lockheed kits + 178 local. Aircraft delivered to Japan only.

SABCA [ARGE West]
(SABCA, Gosselies, Charleroi, Belgium)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-104G 188 Gosselies 1961-mid 1965
Total: 188    

Aircraft delivered to Belgium and West Germany.

Dornier Do 335 Manufacture

Production List

Do 335V series prototypes
14 aircraft built at Friedrichshafen, mid 1943 to mid 1944, and tested at Mengen.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335V-1  CP+UA 230001 First prototype. DB603A-1 engines. First flight 28 Oct 1943
Do 335V-2 CP+UB 230002 To Rechlin, rear engine caught fire, w/o 15 April 1944
Do 335V-3 CP+UC/T9+ZH  230003 A-4 prototype, to Ob.d.L.
Do 335V-4 CP+UD 230004 Do 435 prototype, not completed
Do 335V-5 CP+UE 230005 First with armament fitted, A-2 engines
Do 335V-6 CP+UF 230006 Dornier development a/c, hit by bomb
Do 335V-7 CP+UG 230007 Junkers Jumo 213A & E testbed, Dessau
Do 335V-8 CP+UH 230008 Daimler-Benz DB603E-1 testbed, Stuttgart
Do 335V-9 CP+UI/V9 230009 A-0 prototype, to Rechlin May 1944
Do 335V-10 CP+UK 230010 A-6 prototype night fighter with SN-2 radar
Do 335V-11 CP+UL/11 230011 A-10 prototype trainer
Do 335V-12 CP+UM 230012 A-12 prototype trainer
Do 335V-13 RP+UA/13 230013 B-1 prototype
Do 335V-14 RP+UQ/14 230014 B-2 prototype, to France, with CEV until 4 June 1948

Do 335A-0 pre-production batch
10 aircraft built at Oberpfaffenhofen July-Oct 1944. One example converted to A-4 standard.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335A-0  VG+PG/101  240101 DB603A-2 engines, at Rechlin July 1944, to USAAF as FE-1012 Dec 1945, scrapped
Do 335A-0  VG+PH/102  240102 Sole survivor, to US Navy as BuAer 121447 Dec 1945, now at NASM
Do 335A-0  VG+PI/103  240103 To Ob.d.L. late July 1944
Do 335A-0  VG+PJ/104  240104 To Erkdo 335 Sept 1944
Do 335A-0  VG+PK/105  240105 To Erkdo 335, captured by US at Lechfeld April 1945
Do 335A-0  VG+PL/106  240106 To Erkdo 335
Do 335A-0  VG+PM/107  240107 To Erkdo 335
Do 335A-0  VG+PN/108  240108 To Erkdo 335
Do 335A-0  VG+PO/109  240109 To Erkdo 335
Do 335A-0  VG+PP/110  240110 To Erkdo 335 Oct 1944

Do 335A-1 production batch
11 aircraft built at Oberpfaffenhofen, plus 9 aircraft part assembled, Nov-April 1945.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335A-1  113  240113 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240161 Captured by US. To RAE but w/o on delivery flight 13 Dec 1945 at Merville?
Do 335A-1    240162 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240163 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240164 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240165 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240166 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240167 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240168 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240169 Captured by US
Do 335A-1    240170 Captured by US
Do 335A-1  01 240301 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  02 240302 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  03 240303 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  04 240304 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  05 240305 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  06 240306 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  07 240307 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  08 240308 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-1  09 240309 Partly assembled. Captured by US

Do 335A-2 Project only

Do 335A-3 Project only

Do 335A-4
10 aircraft scheduled Jan-Feb 1945, only 4 part assembled at Oberpfaffenhofen.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335A-4  10  240310 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-4  11  240311 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-4  12  240312 Partly assembled. Captured by US
Do 335A-4  13  240313 Partly assembled. Captured by US

Do 335A-6
None assembled, Heinkel Vienna-Swechat factory bombed out.

Do 335A-10
1 aircraft built at Oberpfaffenhofen, plus 1 aircraft part assembled.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335A-10  111  240111 Flew late Nov 1944. Captured by US at Oberpf.
Do 335A-10    240114 Not completed

Do 335A-12
2 aircraft built at Oberpfaffenhofen, plus 2 aircraft part assembled.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335A-12  112  240112 Air Min 223, to RAE 8 Sept 1945, w/o 18 Jan 1946 near Farnborough
Do 335A-12  121  240121 Captured by US
Do 335A-12  122  240122 Not completed, scrapped by US
Do 335A-12      Partly assembled

Do 335B series prototypes.
6 aircraft part assembled at Oberpfaffenhofen.

Model Code Werk Nr.  Notes
Do 335B-2  RP+UB 14/18  240118 B-2 replacement proto
Do 335V-15  RP+UC 15/19  240119 B-1 2nd prototype, to Lwe Feb 1945
Do 335V-16  RP+UD 16/20  240120 B-2 2nd prototype, night fighter with FuG 218
Do 335V-17  RP+UE 17/16  240116 B-6 prototype, also W Nr 230017, to France CEV, w/o 1947?
Do 335V-18  RP+UF 18/17  240117 B-6 2nd prototype, night fighter, to Lwe Feb 1945
Do 335V-19  RP+UG 19/15  240115 B-3 prototype, not completed
Do 335V-20      B-7 prototype, not completed
Do 335V-21      B-8 prototype, not completed
Do 335V-22      B-8 2nd prototype, not completed

Aerospatiale/BAC Concorde Manufacture

Production List

Aircraft Listing

This page gives brief information of each individual aircraft, together with a note on their final fate.

MSN Reg’n Delivered Last Flight Remarks
001 F-WTSS 19 October 1972 French prototype. Flew 2 March 1969. Preserved Musée de l’Air, Le Bourget, Paris
002 G-BSST 4 March 1976 UK prototype. Flew 9 April 1969. Preserved Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton
101 G-AXDN 20 August 1975 UK pre-production aircraft. Flew 17 December 1971. Preserved Imperial War Museum, Duxford
102 F-WTSA 29 January 1976 French pre-production aircraft. Flew 10 January 1973. Preserved Musée Delta (now Athis Aviation Museum), Orly Airport, Paris
201 F-WTSB First French production aircraft. Flew 6 December 1973. Preserved outside Clement Ader building, Airbus France, Toulouse
202 G-BBDG First UK production aircraft. Flew 13 February 1974. Retired 24 December 1983. Stored Airbus UK, Filton. Due to move to Brooklands Museum, Weybridge
203 F-BTSC 5 January 1976 25 July 2000 Air France. Destroyed in fatal crash on 25 July 2000 at Gonesse, near Paris
204 G-BOAC 13 February 1976 31 October 2003 British Airways. Preserved at Manchester Airport Aviation Viewing Park
205 F-BVFA 19 December 1975 12 June 2003 First Air France delivery. Preserved Smithsonian Museum’s ‘Steven F Udva Hazy Center’ at Dulles Airport, Washington DC
206 G-BOAA 14 January 1976 12 August 2000 First British Airways delivery. Stored Heathrow Airport. Due to move to Museum of Flight, East Fortune, Scotland
207 F-BVFB 8 April 1976 24 June 2003 Air France. Preserved Auto und Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany
208 G-BOAB 30 September 1976 15 August 2000 British Airways. Stored Heathrow Airport. Due to go on display at Heathrow Airport Terminal 5
209 F-BVFC 3 August 1976 27 June 2003 Air France. Preserved outside Aero Constellation building, Airbus France, Toulouse
210 G-BOAD 6 December 1976 10 November 2003 British Airways, Singapore Airline colours 1977-80. Preserved Intrepid Air and Space Museum, New York
211 F-BVFD 26 March 1977 27 May 1982 Air France. Broken up in 1994 at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris
212 G-BOAE 20 July 1977 17 November 2003 British Airways. Preserved at Grantley Adams Airport, Barbados
213 F-BTSD 19 September 1978 14 June 2003 Air France. Preserved Musée de l’Air, Le Bourget, Paris
214 G-BOAG 6 February 1980 5 November 2003 British Airways. Preserved Museum of Flight, Seattle
215 F-BVFF 22 October 1980 11 June 2000 Air France. Preserved at Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris
216 G-BOAF 13 June 1980 26 November 2003 British Airways. Preserved at Airbus UK, Filton, Bristol.

KAI T-50 Golden Eagle

Aircraft Profile
T-50 first prototype 001 at the formal rollout.
(photo, Lockheed Martin)

Development

Although increasingly well known for it’s ships, cars and consumer electronics goods, South Korea also possesses a thriving aerospace industry. An industry which cut its teeth on component manufacture and licenced production has now produced its second Korean-designed aircraft, the T-50 Golden Eagle. That this aircraft should be a supersonic combat aircraft demonstrates the breadth of South Korea’s capability and the extent of its ambition.

Korean Air Lines (KAL) was the first company in South Korea to be involved in aerospace, establishing facilities in 1979 to carry out depot level maintenance of USAF aircraft based in South Korea and the Pacific. Daewoo, Hyundai and Samsung established similar capabilities soon afterwards. In 1981, KAL was contracted to assemble the Northrop F-5E Tiger IIs ordered by the Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF). Korean industry subsequently won contracts to produce a wide range of components and sub-assemblies for Airbus, Boeing, Bombardier and Lockheed Martin – amongst others – and won praise for the high quality of workmanship evident in the delivered items. In 1988, development of South Korea’s first locally-designed aircraft, the Daewoo KT-1 Woong-Bee was initiated. This PC-9 look-alike turboprop trainer first flew in 1991 and entered service with the RoKAF in 2000. In the meantime, Samsung was awarded prime contractor status in the Korean Fighter Programme, under which 108 F-16s were licenced-built for the RoKAF. The contract specified extensive technology transfer to Korean industry, resulting in the last 72 aircraft being wholly built in South Korea.

In 1992, initial design studies were launched by South Korea’s Defence Development Agency and Samsung into the development of an indigenous jet trainer/light attack aircraft to replace the T-38, Hawk and F-5 in RoKAF service. The designation KTX-2 (Korean Trainer, Experimental 2) was assigned to the project. Substantial input into the design was made by General Dynamics (later taken over by Lockheed Martin) under the offset agreement negotiated for the F-16 contract.

In mid 1995 the basic external layout was agreed, but the project stalled at the end of the year as the gathering Asian Financial Crisis mean that available government funding could not now cover the remainder of the project – a foreign partner was essential to carry on. Several major aerospace companies showed interest, but none proved willing to invest their own money. Eventually, Lockheed Martin took the decision to upgrade its existing involvement from that of design consultant to full partner. On 3 July 1997, the South Korean government approved continuation of the project. Later in July, Lockheed Martin signed a formal agreement with Samsung under which it took responsibility for the Fly-By-Wire flight control system, avionics integration, wing design and supply of the APG-167 radar.

In October 1997, the contract to build and test six prototypes was received – including two static test airframes. Detailed design was now able to proceed rapidly and in August 1999 the external shape of the KTX-2 was frozen, allowing manufacturing drawings to start being released.

As part of the country’s economic reforms, Korean Aerospace Industries Ltd (KAI) was formed in October 1999 from the amalgamation of the aerospace divisions of Samsung, Daewoo and Hyundai. The other major South Korean aerospace manufacturer, Korean Air Lines remained outside of the main industry grouping.

In February 2000 it was announced that the KTX-2 had been renamed the T-50/A-50 Golden Eagle. The T-50 Golden Eagle designation being applied to an Advanced Jet Training variant, and A-50 Golden Eagle to an armed Light Attack/Fighter Lead In Trainer variant. Final assembly of the first T-50 prototype began on 15 January 2001, and it was formally rolled out on 31 October 2001. The maiden flight was achieved on 20 August 2002, with flight testing continuing until mid 2005.

The Golden Eagle bears a close resemblance to the F-16 – not really surprising when you consider its origins and the intended role of training RoKAF pilots to fly the F-16 – although it is actually about 80% the size of an F-16. Several design features are shared with its bigger brother, the most noticeable of which is the blended mid-set wing, complete with leading edge root extensions (LERX) and rear ‘shelf’ fairings ending in F-16-style split airbrakes. Sweepback is only applied to the wing leading edge, and missile launch rails are located at the wing tips. In a departure from F-16 influence, the engine air intakes are located at the fuselage sides, just below the wing LERX in a similar manner to those on the F/A-18.

The two crew sit in a tandem stepped cockpit equipped with two large Multi-Function Displays (MFDs), a modern wide-angle Head-Up Display (HUD) and full hands on throttle and stick (HOTAS) controls. The Lead In Fighter Trainer and Attack variants will be equipped with a Lockheed Martin APG-167 radar in the nose and a M61 20 mm cannon in the port wing root. The incorporation of many of the latest-technology but ‘off the shelf’ components and systems within the design is intended to deliver a capable but efficient, reliable and easy to maintain aircraft.

The Golden Eagle already has a production order for 50 T-50 trainers and 44 A-50 Fighter Lead In trainers from the RoKAF. Further domestic orders may follow, to allow replacement of the F-5 and F-4 in RoKAF service. The type also has obvious export potential – particularly among the ever growing number of F-16 operators. It’s manoeuvrability and advanced systems are designed to prepare future pilots to fly the next generation fighters such as the Eurofighter Typhoon, Dassault Rafale and Lockheed Martin F-35, while its combat capability allows dual-role adaptability. Potential rivals, such as the EADS Mako and Aermacchi M-346 have yet to secure any orders, while the class-leading but slow-selling BAE SYSTEMS Hawk may have reached the limit of its development potential. With the marketing clout of Lockheed Martin behind it, the future of the Golden Eagle is sure to be bright.

Front view of T-50 001 with
‘Golden Eagle’ name still concealed
Impression of the T-50 in rollout colours
(All photos Lockheed Martin)

Variants

Requirement Specification: ?
Manufacturers Designation: ?

Development History:
KTX-2 Initial project designation.
T-50A Initial designation for unarmed Advanced Jet Trainer version.
T-50B Initial designation for Fighter Lead In Trainer version, with APG-67 radar and M61 internal gun. Later incorporated into A-50 version.
T-50 Golden Eagle Official designation for unarmed Advanced Jet Trainer version. Also known as T-50 AJT.
A-50 Golden Eagle Official RoKAF designation for armed version with APG-67 radar and M61 internal gun. Also known as T-50 LIFT. Fighter Lead In Trainer/Light Attack variant.
This impression clearly shows the air intakes This view shows T-50s resemblance to the F-16
(All photos Lockheed Martin)

History

Key Dates:
1992    Initial design studies for KTX-2 launched.
July 1994    Overall design layout finalised.
mid 1995    Preliminary design completed.
July 1996    Lockheed Martin chosen as foreign partner.
3 July 1997    Production programme approved by South Korean government.
17 July 1997    Lockheed Martin formally signs production agreement with Samsung.
24 October 1997    Contract to build six prototypes received.
10 November 1997    US Congress approves technology export licence.
12-16 July 1999    Preliminary design review conducted.
August 1999    Overall design frozen.
October 1999    KAI formed from the aerospace divisions of three Korean companies.
February 2000    KTX-2 renamed T-50/A-50 Golden Eagle.
31 July – 4 August 2000    Critical design review conducted.
15 January 2001    Final assembly of first prototype begun.
31 October 2001    Official roll out of first prototype**
20 August 2002    Maiden flight of first T-50 prototype.
8 November 2002    Maiden flight of second T-50 prototype.
19 February 2003    T-50 prototype exceeds Mach 1 for the first time.
29 August 2003    Maiden flight of first T-50 LIFT (A-50) prototype.
4 September 2003    Maiden flight of second T-50 LIFT (A-50) prototype.
late 2003    Start of series production.
mid 2005    End of flight test programme.
October 2005    First production T-50 rolled out.
2010    Last production A-50 for RoKAF delivered.

** Air International quotes 28 September 2001 as the rollout date, but this was only the anticipated rollout date in January 2001. Lockheed Martin press releases quote the October date.

Operators

Military Operators

South Korea – Air Force (94 T-50 & A-50 planned)

Government Agencies

South Korea – T-50 Combined Test Force (2 T-50 & 2 A-50 planned)

Civilian Operators

None  
T-50 001 being rolled out T-50 001 after the official naming ceremony
(All photos Lockheed Martin)

Specifications

KAI T-50 Golden Eagle
Crew: Two
Dimensions: Length 42 ft 7 in (12.98 m); Height 15 ft 8.25 in (4.78 m); Wing Span 30 ft 1 in (9.17 m); Wing Area TBA sq ft (TBA sq m)
Engines: One General Electric F404-GE-402 turbofan rated at 11,925 lb st dry (53.07 kN) and 17,775 lb st (79.1 kN) with reheat
Weights: Empty Equipped 14,200 lb (6,441 kg); Maximum Take-off 26,400 lb (11,975 kg)
Armament: (A-50 only) 20-mm M61A1 Vulcan cannon in port LERX with 208 rounds, wingtip launch rails for AIM-9 Sidewinder or similar missiles, four underwing hardpoints and one under-fuselage centre-line pylon.
Performance: Maximum level speed ‘clean’ Mach 1.4; Maximum rate of climb at sea level 27,000 ft/min (8225 m/min); Service ceiling 48,000 ft (14,630 m); Range with full fuel 1,000 nm (1,150 mls, 1,850 km)

Production

Design Centre

Head of Design Team: Not known
Design Office: KAI, Sachon, South Korea.

Manufacture

Korean Aerospace Industries
(KAI, Sachon, South Korea)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
T-50/A-50 prototypes 6* Sachon 2001-2003
T-50 50 Sachon late 2003-?
A-50 44 Sachon ?-2010
Total: 100    

* two T-50, two A-50 and two static test airframes.
Subcontractors: Wings (Lockheed Martin), Aft Fuselage (Korean Air Lines).

Total Produced: 100 a/c (planned)

Production List

To be added.

The first T-50 LIFT, with gun and radar fitted The second T-50 LIFT wears grey camouflage
(All photos Lockheed Martin)

More Information

Books

None yet published.

Magazines

Air International February 2002
Flight International various issues

Links

Korean Aerospace Industries
(Official KAI website)

Shop

Flight Simulator Models:
To be added.

Scale Models:
To be added.

Scale Drawings:
To be added.

Videos:

To be added.

Armstrong Whitworth Licenced Production

Other Manufacturers Designs

Click on aircraft type for more details

Popular Name Total Built First Flight
RAF B.E.2a 1 ?
RAF B.E.2b 500 1915
RAF B.E.2c 1652 1916
RAF R.E.7 1 ?
RAF R.E.8 1 1916
Bristol F2B Fighter 1 1916
Hawker Hart 9 1916
Avro Lancaster 1 1918
Avro Lincoln 2 1918
Gloster Meteor 2 1920
Gloster Prone-Pilot Meteor 1 1923
Hawker Sea Hawk ? 1923
Hawker Hunter 3 1923
Gloster Javelin 7 1926

Armstrong Whitworth Production

Original Designs

Click on aircraft type for more details

Model Number Popular Name Total Built First Flight
F.K.1   1 ?
F.K.3   500 1915
F.K.8   1652 1916
F.K.5   1 ?
F.K.6   1 1916
F.K.9   1 1916
F.K.10   9 1916
F.M.4 Armadillo 1 1918
unknown Ara 2 1918
unknown Awana 2 1920
unknown Wolf 5 1923
unknown Siskin ? 1923
unknown Ape 3 1923
unknown Argosy 7 1926
unknown Atlas 478 1925
unknown Ajax 4 1926
A.W.14 Starling 4+ 1929
A.W.XV Atalanta 8 1932
A.W.XVI   7 1930
A.W.17 (project) 0  
A.W.17 Ares 1 1930
A.W.18 (project) 0  
A.W.19   1 1931
A.W.20 (project) 0  
A.W.21 (project) 0  
A.W.22 (project) 0  
A.W.23   1 1935
A.W.27 Ensign 14 1938
A.W.29   1 1936
A.W.35 Scimitar 5 1934
A.W.38 Whitley 1814 1936
A.W.41 Albemarle 602 ?
A.W.52G   1 1945
A.W.52   2 1947
A.W.55 Apollo 2 1949
A.W.167 (project) 0  
A.W.168 (project) 0  
A.W.169 (project) 0  
A.W.170 (project) 0  
A.W.650 Argosy ? 1959
A.W.660 Argosy C Mk.1 ? 1961
A.W.680 (project) 0  
A.W.681 (project) 0  
A.W.682 (project) 0  
A.W.690 (project) 0  

Armstrong Whitworth

Manufacturer Profile
 

Key Facts

Official Name(s) Sir W. G. Armstrong Whitworth & Co Ltd (1913-1918)
Sir W. G. Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft Ltd (1920-1961)
Headquarters To be added
Country United Kingdom
Date Established 18 October 1913
Current Status Ceased
Date Ceased 24 May 1961

History

Text text text text text text text text text Military, Civil, Dual Use
Status – Operational, Care & Maintenance, Abandoned, Returned to Fields, Built Over
Category – Public Airport, Air Base, Airfield, Landing Strip etc
History Google Maps link Last Updated Use – Military, Civil, Dual Use
Status – Operational, Care & Maintenance, Abandoned, Returned to Fields, Built Over
Category – Public Airport, Air Base, Airfield, Landing Strip etc
History Google Maps link Last Updated

Use – Military, Civil, Dual Use Status – Operational, Care & Maintenance, Abandoned,
Returned to Fields, Built Over Category – Public Airport, Air Base, Airfield, Landing Strip
etc History Google Maps link Last Updated Use – Military, Civil, Dual Use Status – Operational, Care & Maintenance,
Abandoned, Returned to Fields, Built Over Category – Public Airport, Air Base, Airfield, Landing Strip etc
History Google Maps link Last Updated

Use – Military, Civil, Dual Use
Status – Operational, Care & Maintenance, Abandoned, Returned to Fields, Built Over
Category – Public Airport, Air Base, Airfield, Landing Strip etc History Google Maps link
Last Updated Use – Military, Civil, Dual Use
Status – Operational, Care & Maintenance, Abandoned, Returned to Fields, Built Over
Category – Public Airport, Air Base, Airfield, Landing Strip etc
History Google Maps link Last Updated

Chief Designer(s)

George Atkins (1915-1924)
Elliot Blackstone (1924-1944)
T. R. Hawthorne (1944-1961)

Aircraft

Original Designs

List of Aircraft Models

Licenced Production

Other Manufacturers Designs

Factories

To be added.

More Information

Books

Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft Since 1913 by Oliver Tapper (Putnam, 1988)

World Encyclopedia of Aircraft Manufacturers by Bill Gunston (Sutton Publishing, 2005)

British Aircraft Manufacturers Since 1908 by Gunter Endres (Ian Allan, 1995)

British Built Aircraft, Volume 4: Central & Eastern England by Ron Smith (Sutton Publishing, 2004)

Magazines

Air Enthusiast No.43 & 44

Websites

wikipedia: Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft

Armstrong Whitworth