Romanian Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

In 1910 a small Flying Corps (Corpul Aerian Romana) was established by the Romanian Army. During the First World War the Flying Corps disintegrated as the country was overrun by Austro-German forces.
After the Romanian government was reestablished in 1918, it set about forming a new air arm, called the Divisia-I-a Aeriana, under a Directorate of Army Aviation.
The new air arm expanded rapidly, and was able to rely increasingly on the domestic aircraft industry. Unfortunately, when World War Two arrived, most of this equipment was obsolete and, with Romania staying neutral, it became difficult to obtain new aircraft from abroad. In September 1940, a Luftwaffe advisory mission arrived to reorganise the air force, (by now called the Fortelor Aerienne Regal de Romana), and on 23 November 1940 Romania signed the Axis Tripartite Pact.
The number of German ‘instructors’ was progressively increased, as was the quantity of German aircraft supplied. When Germany attacked Russia on 22 June 1941, Romanian air elements supported the German attack on the Bessarabian front. By the beginning of 1944, the Romanian squadrons operating in Russia had suffered huge losses, equivalent to almost half of the total front-line strength of the Romanian air force. The severely weakened force was withdrawn to help with countering growing Allied air attacks on the Ploesti oilfields.
The anti-fascist coup of 23 August 1944 took the Germans completely by surprise. Attempts were made to move German troops into Bucharest by air, but as the Romanians held all the serviceable airfields, the operation was cancelled.
Following the Soviet occupation of Romania, a peace treaty was signed in 1947. The air force was renamed the Fortele Aerienne ale Republicii Populare Romana and reorganised along Soviet lines. In 1953 the first MiG-15 jet fighters were supplied. In 1965 the air force was renamed Fortele Aerienne ale Republicii Socialiste Romana.
Following the general uprising of December 1989, the air force assumed it’s present title of Fortele Aerienne Romane. In the rebuilding process following the change of government, the air force has been accorded priority status. Aircraft serviceability levels have risen from their previously very low levels and the ageing MiG-21 fleet is undergoing the Lancer upgrade with help from Elbit Systems.

Key Dates:
1910    Romanian Flying Corps first established by the Army
1918    Romanian Air Division formed
September 1940    German advisors arrive to re-organise the Air Force
22 June 1941    Romania joins the German attack on Russia
23 August 1944    Romania joins the Allies after anti-facist coup
1951    First jet aircraft delivered – Yak-17
1956    Air Force disbanded following Romanian Uprising
1955    First helicopters received – Mi-1

Current Status

To be added

Future Plans

Possible transfer of helicopter units to Army control.
Take delivery of 24 improved IAR-99 Soim to repace L-39ZA.
Convert 24 IAR.330 Pumas to SOCAT standard for anti-tank role.
Replace An-24/An-26 with C-27J medium transport aircraft.
Acquire another 4 used C-130s when funds permit.
Retire Lancers from service by 2008-2010 and replace them with 40-48 new western fighters.
Obtain 12 new transport helicopters.

Markings

National Insignia

National Insignia

Aircraft Serial Numbers

The Romanian military serial numbering system consists of a two, three or four figure number taken from part of the aircraft’s individual construction number, e.g. MiG-21PFM 4708.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Table of Current Service Aircraft

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

False reports of aircraft on order or in service

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Bucharest.

Organisational Structure

The air force is organised into a number of Air Base units, comprising between 2 and 4 squadrons.

Current Order of Battle

Table of Current Order of Battle

Historical Orders of Battle

List of Historical Orders of Battle – to be added.

All-Time Flying Units List

To be added.

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

The main air bases currently used are Bacau, Boboc, Borcea-Fetesti, Brasov-Ghimbav, Campia Turzii and Otopeni-Bucharest.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

In addition to the main bases, there are also a number of smaller airports and airfields around the country which are sometimes used by the Air Force.
Military Air Bases Listing – to be added.

More Information

Books

Romanian Military Aviation Bibliography – to be added.

Magazines

Air Forces Monthly February 1999
Scramble No.217 October 1997

Websites

Romanian Air Force Official Website

wikipedia: Romanian Air Force

Scramble: Romanian Air Force

PlanePictures.net

Airliners.net

Air-Britain Photos: Romanian Air Force

Camouflage & Markings: Fighters of the Romanian Air Force

WW2: Romanian Royal Aeronautics

Axis History: Romanian Air Force

Romanian Military History Forum

Target aviation Photography: Romanian Air Force

Royal Canadian Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

A short-lived Canadian Air Force was established in November 1918 in Europe, but disbanded in February 1920. Back at home, a new Canadian Air Force was formed in the same month by the Army as an auxiliary reservist force. On 1 April 1924 the Canadian Air Force was granted the title ‘Royal’ and gained a permanent staff. On 19 November 1938 the RCAF became an independent service, separate from the Army. On 1 February 1968 it amalgamated with the Army and Navy into a single service – the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). In 1975, the various CAF aviation units were reorganised into a single Air Command. On 31 July 1997, the previous organisation of Air Transport Group, Fighter Group, Maritime Air Group and 10 Tactical Air Group was replaced by 1 Canadian Air Division/Canadian NORAD Region (1 CAD/CANR). The word ‘Armed’ was dropped from the force title around the same time, resulting in the air force being known as the Canadian Forces Air Command. On 16 August 2011, the CAF Air Command was restored to its traditional title of Royal Canadian Air force.

Key Dates

18 February 1920 Canadian Air Force established.
1 April 1924 Royal prefix added – Royal Canadian Air Force.
1939-1945 RCAF units serve in Europe and the Mediterranean, as well as the Pacific during WW2.
1949 1st Air Division RCAF established in Europe as part of NATO.
1957 NORAD – North American Air Defence Command – established jointly with USA.
1 February 1968 Canadian Armed Forces formed from amalgamation of Air Force, Army and Navy.
1975 CAF aviation units reorganised into a single Air Command
16 August 2011 CAF renamed Royal Canadian Air Force.

Current Status

All RCAF aircraft and helicopters are currently active.

Future Plans

Take delivery of 65 Lockheed Martin F-35s – subject to final order confirmation.
Buy 18 F/A-18E Super Hornets to supplement the ageing CF-118 fleet – CANCELLED.
Obtain an unspecified number of F-18A/B Hornets from Australia to supplement the CF-118 fleet.
Select a new fighter to supplement or substitute for the F-35 – hopefully the Eurofighter Typhoon
Replace the CH-124 Sea King with 28 Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone helicopters.
Replace the CC-115 Buffalo with 16 CASA C-295 SAR aircraft from 2019.


Markings

National Insignia

National Insignia

Aircraft Serial Numbers

Aircraft operating with the RCAF carry numerical serial numbers. The numbers have been issued in four different series:

First Series (1922-1928)
RCAF aircraft initially carried civil registrations in the sequence G-CYAA to G-CYZZ, with only the last two letters actually displayed on the aircraft, e.g. Puss Moth UT.
Second Series (1928-1968)
In 1928 the military aircraft registration system was switched to a numerical sequence. This numerical sequence consisted of a three-digit number allocated in blocks by aircraft function: 1-300 for trainers, 301-400 for fighters, 401-600 for General Purpose, 601-700 for Transports, 701-800 for Bombers, 801-1000 for Flying Boats. As example is Douglas Digby 740.
Third Series (1939-1968)
By 1939 the available numbers in some blocks had been used up, and so a new sequence of four-digit serials was adopted. The numbers were allocated in blocks by aircraft type, with spaces left for future procurement, e.g. Cessna Crane 8000. In 1942 the system was extended to five-digit numbers.
Fourth Series (1968-Present)
For the merger of Air Force, Navy and Army into the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), the Canadian military serial numbering system was changed to a six digit number. The first three numbers replicate the aircraft designation number and identify the aircraft type. The last three numbers are the individual airframe identity, and count from x00 or x01 for each type. An example is CF-101B Voodoo 101033. Newly procured aircraft adopted the revised system immediately, but existing aircraft were only renumbered in the period 1970 to 1973. This system was retained when the CAF reverted to its traditional title of Royal Canadian Air Force,
RAF Aircraft
Aircraft operated by 400-series Squadrons in Europe, North Africa and the Far East often used RAF-supplied aircraft, which retained their RAF serials.
Instructional Airframes
Unflyable aircraft used for ground training purposes were allocated a number in the range 1-1000 with a letter prefix of A, B or C, e.g. Harvard A175. After unification in 1968 the prefix was generally replaced by a suffix, e.g. Canadair CF-116 906B.

Unit/Base Codes

A Royal Air Force-style unit coding system was used 1939-1945. Details to be added.


Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

Canadian Military Aircraft Designations.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Table of Current Service Aircraft

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

False reports of aircraft on order or in service

Aircraft Losses and Incidents

Aviation Safety Network: RCAF
Aviation Safety Network: Canadian Armed Forces


Organisation

Main Headquarters

National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, ONT.

Organisational Structure

The RCAF is organised into 1 Canadian Air Division with 10 Wings – one wing for each major air base – and 2 Canadian Air Division with one wing and the Air Force Training Centre. Each wing has up to six Squadrons of aircraft.

Current Order of Battle

Table of Current Order of Battle

Historical Orders of Battle

List of Historical Orders of Battle – to be added.

All-Time Flying Units List

Units Listing


Air Bases

Current Air Bases

See current order of battle.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

To be added.

Aircraft-Carrying Ships

Since 1975 all aircraft supporting the Canadian Armed Forces Maritime Command (Royal Canadian Navy from 2011) have been operated by Air Command (Royal Canadian Air Force from 2011).
A list of ships hosting CAF/RCAF aircraft will be added.


More Information

Books

Canadian Military Aviation Bibliography

Magazines

World Air Power Journal No.1 p.83
World Air Power Journal No.15 p.134
Air Pictorial February 1998

Websites

Official Royal Canadian Air Force webpage

wikipedia: Royal Canadian Air Force

Scramble: Canadian Armed Forces Overview

PlanePictures.net

Airliners.net

Air-Britain Photos: Canadian Armed Forces

Air-Britain Photos: Royal Canadian Air Force

Aircraft of the Canadian Armed Forces

Air Force Association of Canada

Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum

Any photographs illustrating this operator would be welcome.

 

Royal Thai Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) is one of the oldest air forces in Asia, being formed in 1913. Three Thai Army officers, who had been sent to France for pilot training, returned in November 1913 with eight military aircraft. This formed the basis for establishing the Siamese Flying Corps, which operated under Army control until 1937, when it became an independent service called the Royal Siam Air Force. Two years later the service was renamed the Royal Thai Air force.

Key Dates

28 Feb 1912    First Thai Army officers sent to France for pilot training
2 Nov 1913    Siamese Flying Corps first established
1919    Siamese Flying Corps renamed Royal Siamese Aeronautical Service
1937    Royal Siamese Aeronautical Service renamed Royal Siamese Air Force
1939    Royal Siamese Air Force renamed Royal Thai Air Force

Current Status

The Royal Thai Air Force is fully operational.

Future Plans

To be added.

Markings

National Insignia

To be added.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

Since 1949, the RTAF has operated a sophisticated serial numbering system that describes the aircraft role, type, individual number and year of purchase. Full details are given on Steve Darke’s Thai-Aviation website – see link below. The number is displayed in Thai script in a relatively small font. In addition, aircraft often retain the serial number assigned by the previous operator, e.g. the US FMS serial.

Unit/Base Codes

Each RTAF aircraft carries an individual squadron code, in addition to the air force serial, which can be reused as aircraft are retired. For front-line aircraft the code is normally a five-digit number, while for second-line aircraft shorter numbers are often used.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

The RTAF has its own aircraft designation system which is incorporated into the aircraft serial number, as mentioned above.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Table of Current Service Aircraft

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

To be added.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Don Muang Air Base, Bangkok.

Organisational Structure

The RTAF is organised into four Air Divisions, each comprising two or three Wings. Each Wing has between one and six Squadrons.

Current Order of Battle

Table of Current Order of Battle

Historical Orders of Battle

To be added.

All-Time Flying Units List

To be added

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

See current order of battle.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

To be added.

More Information

Books

World Air Forces Directory 2013/14 by Ian Carroll (Mach III)

Magazines

World Air Power Journal Vo.8 p.145-146

Websites

Official Royal Thai Air Force website

wikipedia: Thai Air Force

Scramble: Thailand

Global Security: Royal Thai Air Force

Thai Aviation

Eritrean Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

Eritrean gained its independence from Ethiopia in 1993. During the independence war, a number of aircraft and helicopters were captured from Ethiopia. In 1994 an Eritrean Air Force was formally established. The first equipment comprised former Ethiopian Air Force aircraft. To enable a full range of operational capabilities, transport aircraft were obtained from China and training aircraft from Finland and Italy. Following the acquisition of Su-27s by Ethiopia in 1998, a batch of MiG-29s was delivered to maintain military parity.

Key Dates

1994    Eritrean Air Force first established

Current Status

The Eritrean Air Force is fully operational.

Future Plans

To be added.

Markings

National Insignia

To be added.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

The Eritrean Air Force serial numbering system normally consists of a three digit number plus the prefix ‘ERAF-‘ or ‘ER-‘. Trainer aircraft appear to carry no serial prefix. e.g. ER-102 for MiG-21, ERAF-301 for Mi-17 and 404 for MB339.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Table of Current Service Aircraft

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

To be added.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Asmara.

Organisational Structure

The ErAF is organised into 8 Squadrons of aircraft.

Current Order of Battle

Table of Current Order of Battle

Historical Orders of Battle

To be added.

All-Time Flying Units List

1 Squadron
2 Squadron
3 Squadron
4 Squadron
5 Squadron
6 Squadron
7 Squadron
8 Squadron

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

See current order of battle.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

To be added.

More Information

Books

African Air Forces by Winston Brent (Freeworld Publications)

World Air Forces Directory 2013/14 by Ian Carroll (Mach III)

Magazines

To be added.

Websites

Pictures of the Eritrean Air Force

wikipedia: Eritrean Air Force

Scramble: Eritrea

South Sudan Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

South Sudan gained autonomy on 9 July 2005. Legislation to enable the creation of a South Sudan Air Force (SSAF) was approved in June 2008. The first aircraft was received in February 2010, and the first helicopters from an initial order for 10 was received in December 2010. Full independence from Sudan was achieved on 9 July 2011. Initially called the Sudan People’s Liberation Air Force, it appears to have become the Sudan People’s Air Force by 2010, and later assumed it’s present title.

Continued political instability in the country resulted in a civil war breaking out on 15 December 2015. The Air Force has been involved in supporting government forces in retaining control of most of the country.

Key Dates

24 June 2008    South Sudan Air Force formally created
Feb 2010    First fixed-wing aircraft received – Beech 1900
Dec 2010    First helicopters received – Mi-17

Current Status

The South Sudan Air Force is fully operational.

Future Plans

To be added.

Markings

National Insignia

The South Sudan Air Force uses a black-red-green roundel with a blue leading segment containing a yellow star. The national flag is used as a fin flash.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

SSAF helicopters carry serials consisting of a three digit number and the prefix ‘SPAF-‘ e.g. SPAF-106 for a Mil-17V-5. The Beech 1900 carried the last three letters of it’s civil registration.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Table of Current Service Aircraft

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

To be added.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Juba Air Base, Juba.

Organisational Structure

The SSAF is organised into a Helicopter Unit and a Fixed Wing Unit.

Current Order of Battle

Table of Current Order of Battle

Historical Orders of Battle

To be added.

All-Time Flying Units List

Helicopter Unit
Fixed Wing Unit

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

All aircraft are based at Juba IAP.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

To be added.

More Information

Books

World Air Forces Directory 2013/14 by Ian Carroll (Mach III)

Magazines

To be added.

Websites

Southern Sudan’s new air force

wikipedia: South Sudan Air Force

Scramble: South Sudan

Katanga Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The former Belgian Congo was given independence on 30 June 1960, amid a prolonged period of political and economic upheaval. Very shortly afterwards, the Province of Katanga declared unilateral independence from the newly established Republic of Congo. The breakaway province was fortunate in having many of the assets of the former colonial policing air arm, the Aviation de la Force Publique du Congo. All AFP aircraft in Katanga were immediately seized and used to form a new air arm, the Katanga Air Force, or Avikat for short. Additional aircraft were later obtained via a variety of legal and illegal means.

The Congo government successfully appealed from help from the United Nations, and a civil war followed, which saw the Katanga Air Force operate extensively in direct support of the rebel ground forces. The United Nations air and ground forces eventually proved decisive, with the Katangan capital Elisabethville being captured on 30 December 1962 and the remnants of the Katangan forces being rounded up soon after. On 21 January 1963, the last stronghold of Kolwezi surrended, formally ending the war.

Key Dates

11 July 1960    Katanga Air Force created
6 Jan 1963    Avikat disbanded

Current Status

The Katanga Air Force was disbanded in January 1963.

Future Plans

Not applicable.

Markings

National Insignia

The Katanga Air Force used a red-green-white roundel.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

Katanga Air Force aircraft carried numerical serial prefixed by the letters KAT or KA, e.g. Piper PA-22 KAT-72.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Not applicable.

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

To be added.

Aircraft Losses and Incidents

See individual aircraft histories.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Luano Airfield, Elisabethville.

Organisational Structure

To be added.

Current Order of Battle

Not applicable.

Historical Orders of Battle

Order of Battle for 1960
Order of Battle for 1961
Order of Battle for late 1962

All-Time Flying Units List

To be added.

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

Not applicable.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

The main air base was Luano, but Kolwezi, Jadotville, Kisenge, Dilolo and Kipushi were also used.

To be added.

More Information

Books

African Military Aviation by Winston A. Brent (Freeworld Publications, 1994)

African Air Forces by Winston Brent (Freeworld Publications, 1999)

Air Wars and Aircraft by Victor Flintham (Arms and Armour Press, 1989)

Magazines

To be added.

Websites

wikipedia: Katangese Air Force

Katangan Air Force

Biafran Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The Eastern Region of Nigeria announced its secession as the State of Biafra on 30 May 1967. Having no existing air power, the Biafran Air Force was hastily assembled from a number of aircraft and personnel obtained from abroad. The aircraft were delivered via a variety of legal and illegal means. The Nigerian Army attacked Biafra in July, but Biafran forces counter-attacked and were able to expand their territory. A civil war followed, which saw the Biafran Air Force operate extensively in support of ground forces.

Both the Biafran and Nigerian air forces saw significant expansion during the civil war. Biafra obtained several AT-6s and famously about a dozen MFI-9 ‘Minicons’ for light attack duties, but the Nigerians introduced MiG-17s and Il-28s. In December 1969 Nigerian Federal forces launched a final offensive and Biafra surrendered in January 1970. Most airworthy aircraft fled abroad.

Key Dates

23 Apr 1967    First aircraft obtained – a formerly hijacked F27
July 1967    Biafran Air Force created
13 Jan 1970    Biafra surrenders

Current Status

The Biafran Air Force was disbanded in January 1970.

Future Plans

Not applicable.

Markings

National Insignia

The red-black-green Biafran roundel was rarely carried.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

Biafran Air Force aircraft either retained there previous registration or serial, or operated without any external identity markings, e.g. T-6 14810.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Not applicable.

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

Several aircraft were obtained clandestinely for Biafra, but didn’t manage to complete the delivery flight. These included two Meteor NF.14 night fighters and five Fouga Magisters.

Aircraft Losses and Incidents

See individual aircraft histories.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

The BAF headquarters moved several times due to the course of the civil war. The initial location was Enugu.

Organisational Structure

The BAF was initially without much organisational structure, but by 1969 consisted of a Training Command and a Tactical Air Command. The units of the former are unknown. The latter had up to three squadrons.

Current Order of Battle

Not applicable.

Historical Orders of Battle

Order of Battle for late 1967
Order of Battle for mid 1968
Order of Battle for late 1969

All-Time Flying Units List

42 Squadron
45 Squadron
47 Squadron
? units flying the B-25, B-26, C-47 etc.

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

Not applicable.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

The main air base was Enugu, but Port Harcourt, Orlu and Uli were also used.

To be added.

More Information

Books

African Military Aviation by Winston A. Brent (Freeworld Publications, 1994)

African Air Forces by Winston Brent (Freeworld Publications, 1999)

Air Wars and Aircraft by Victor Flintham (Arms and Armour Press, 1989)

Shadows: Airlift and Airwar in Biafra and Nigeria 1967-1970 by Micheal I Draper (Hikoki Publications, 1999)

Magazines

To be added.

Websites

Biafran Invaders

wikipedia: Biafra – Military

MFI och Biafra – 7

Royal Saudi Land Forces

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The Royal Saudi Land Forces (RSLF) is the oldest branch of the Saudi military, being formed in 1902 at the start of the War of Unification of Saudi Arabia. The Army was modernised to keep pace with military developments in the following decades. In 1988 (1986?) a plan to establish an Aviation branch was approved and the first helicopters joined the RSLF Aviation Command in 1990. An airborne attack capability was added in 1992, with the arrival of AH-64 Apache helicopters.

Key Dates

13 Jan 1902    Royal Saudi Land Forces first established
1988?    RSLF Aviation Command created
1990    First helicopters received – Bell 406CS

Current Status

The Aviation Command is fully operational.

Future Plans

To be added.

Markings

National Insignia

Current — Historical

Aircraft Serial Numbers

The Saudi Army serial numbering system consists of a three digit number (Bell 406CS and Schweizer 330) or a five digit mumber (S-70/UH-60 and AH-64), e.g. 844 for Bell 406CS and 27181 for UH-60L.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used.

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used.

Current Aircraft Inventory

Table of Current Service Aircraft

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

False reports of aircraft on order or in service

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Airport Rd, Riyadh 11165.

Organisational Structure

The RSLFAC is organised into two Aviation Battalions and one Aviation Group.

Current Order of Battle

Table of Current Order of Battle

Historical Orders of Battle

To be added.

All-Time Flying Units List

1st Aviation Battalion
2nd Aviation Battalion
3rd Aviation Group

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

The main air base is Hafr Al Batin at King Khalid Military City.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

As above.

More Information

Books

Saudi Military Aviation Bibliography – to be added.

Magazines

To be added.

Websites

Official RSLF website

wikipedia: Saudi Arabian Army

Scramble: Saudi Arabia

Danish Naval Aviation

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The orginal Danish Naval air arm was amalgamated with the Army air arm into the RDanAF in 1950. Naval aviation was resumed in 1962 when Alouette III helicopters were delivered for fishery protection and rescue duties. In 1971 the navy unit was named the Soevaernets Flyvetjaeneste (SVF, Danish Naval Air Service). Aircraft were maintained by 722 sqn of the Air Force, on behalf of the Navy.

The SVF was originally planned to be merged onto the RDanAF in 2003 as 728 Esk, along with the Army’s helicopters, but in recognition of its importance, was reorganised under its present title in January 2004 at a new air base. Danish naval helicopters were used primarily for Fishery Patrol, shipboard support and coastal Search & Rescue (SAR) missions. On 31 December 2010 the SHT was disbanded and transferred to the RDanAF as Eskadrille 723.

Key Dates

1962 Naval aviation resumed using Alouette III helicopters.
1971 Naval aviation unit named Soevaernets Flyvetjaeneste.
January 2004 Naval aviation unit renamed to present title.
31 December 2010 Naval aviation unit disbanded and transferred to thr RDanAF.

Current Status

The service has been transferred to Air Force control.

Future Plans

Not applicable.

Markings

National Insignia

CurrentHistorical

Aircraft Serial Numbers

Danish navy helicopters used the same serialling system as the air force – a letter prefix and unique three figure number for each airframe.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used

Current Aircraft Inventory

Not applicable.

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Instructional Airframes

Retired aircraft used for technical training

Aircraft NOT Used

False reports of aircraft on order or in service – none known.

Aircraft Losses and Incidents

None known.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

PO Box 202, DK-2950 Vedbaek.

Organisational Structure

All helicopters are based at Karup and onboard five ships.

Current Order of Battle

Not applicable.

Historical Orders of Battle

The order of battle between 2004 and 2010 was as below:
Click on unit name for more details

Squadron Type Base
SHT Super Lynx Mk.90B Karup

All-Time Flying Units List

Soevaernets Helikopter Tjeneste

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

Not applicable.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

Until 2003 the main naval helicopter base was at Vaerlose. Subsequently, all helicopters were operated from Karup – the military helicopter base for Denmark.
Military Air Bases List
Aircraft & helicopter carrying ships list

More Information

Books

None known.

Magazines

World Air Power Journal No.1 p.134
Air International Feb 1995

Websites

Official Danish Navy webpage
wikipedia: Royal Danish Navy
Naval Aviation Fleet List 1962-Present
airliners.net

Any photographs illustrating this operator would be welcome.

Danish Army Aviation

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The RDanAF began flying Piper L-4 Cubs for artillery spotting on behalf of the Army in 1957. A dedicated Army aviation unit was established 1971 for observation and liaison duties, flying the Piper L-4 and Hughes 500. In 1980 an anti-tank capability was added with the arrival of the Fennec. Vandel AB closed in 2003 and both helicopter units moved to Karup, combining to become Esk 724 under RDanAF control.

Key Dates

1957 AOP unit established by the RDanAF.
1971 Separate Army aviation unit established.
2003 Army aviation unit moves to Karup to become part of the RDanAF.

Current Status

In 2003 Army aviation was amalgamated into the RDanAF, and became Esk 724 at Karup.

Future Plans

Not applicable.

Markings

National Insignia

CurrentHistorical

Aircraft Serial Numbers

Danish army aircraft used the same serialling system as the air force – a letter prefix and unique three figure number for each airframe.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used

Current Aircraft Inventory

Not applicable.

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

Four Bell UH-1H helicopters were offered by the USA in March 1996, but finally rejected in September 1997.

Aircraft Losses and Incidents

None known.

Organisation

Main Headquarters

PO Box 202, DK-2950 Vedbaek.

Organisational Structure

Army Aviation comprises one Battalion with two Companies.

Current Order of Battle

Not applicable.

Historical Orders of Battle

(The order of battle did not change between 1980 and 2003.
Table of the Order of Battle for 1995

All-Time Flying Units List

Observations-Helikopter Kompagni
Panservaerns-Helikopter Kompagni

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

Not applicable.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

Until 2003 the main army helicopter base was at Vandel.


More Information

Books

None known.

Magazines

World Air Power Journal No.1 p.134
Air International Feb 1995

Websites

Official Danish Army webpage

wikipedia: Royal Danish Army

airliners.net

Danish Piper Cubs

Any photographs illustrating this operator would be welcome.