Aircraft Not Used

by the Estonian Border Guard

This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Estonian Border Guard but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

Yakovlev Yak-52
2 Yak-52 were reportedly in service from 1999, but none have been identified.

Aircraft Not Used
Estonian Air Force (post-WW2)

This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Estonian Air Force but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

Bell AH-1
A small number of AH-1 attack helicopters was offered – free of charge – by the US Government, but the offer was declined.

SAAB 105
The Swedish Government offered some free SAAB 105 trainers, but the offer was not taken up.

Yakovlev Yak-52
2 Yak-52 were reportedly in service from 1999, but none have been identified.

Aircraft Reported in Service

with the North Korean Air Force

Aero L-39C Albatros

A dozen Aero L-39C Albatros advanced training jet aircraft were reportedly delivered before 1990. If so, these L-39Cs were former Soviet Air Force aircraft. If any L-39C’s indeed are operated by the DPRKAF, they are most likely operated by the Kimchaek Air Academy, based at Chongjin.

Bell P-63C Kingcobra Fred

At least one example of the P-63 was reportedly delivered prior to 1950. However, this remains unconfirmed.

Beriev MBR-2 Mote

A few of these 1930s flying boats are said to have been delivered in 1951. Not confirmed. Amazingly, an MBR-2 was reported to have strafed Kimpo airfield during the early hours of 16 June 1951.

Ilyushin Il-2m3 Stormovik Bark

Examples of the famed Il-2 Stormovik are said to have been delivered in 1948. Most likely this is a misidentification with the later Ilyushin Il-10 Beast.

Ilyushin Il-12 Coach

No less than 10 of these twin-engine transports are said to have entered service in 1951, being withdrawn in 1991. Not confirmed. However, one Il-12 was shot down on the last day of open hostilities, June 27, 1953. It is probable that this particular Il-12 belonged to a Russian unit.

KAAI 2K-1

Some of these Soviet primary gliders were reportedly one of the first non-Japanese aircraft to enter service in 1945/46. Not confirmed.

Lavochkin La-7 Fin

An unknown quantity of La-7s was reportedly supplied to North Korea. On June 26, 1950, two DPRKAF fighters identified as La-7s reportedly made firing passes on two 68th FS F-82 Twin Mustangs. No combat ensued, as the American pilots were under orders to “keep a low profile.” However, the following day, on June 27, two La-7s was claimed as shot down by Maj J W Little of the 339th (AW)S, and 1st Lt ‘Chalky’ Moran of the 68th (AW)S, both flying F-82 Twin Mustangs. A third La-7 was claimed two days later, on June 29, by 1st Lt W T Norris of the 9th FBS. Presumably, this is a misidentification with the improved Lavochkin La-9/-11 series.

Lavochkin La-7UTI

Two two-seat conversion trainers said to have entered service in 1950. Not confirmed.

Lavochkin La-15 Fantail

An early Soviet jet fighter, a number of La-15s are said to have been delivered to the DRPKAF. Unlikely.

Maeda Ku-10

A few of these gliders were reportedly left behind by the Japanese. Unconfirmed.

Mil Mi-14PL Haze-A

A few reportedly delivered in 1989. Unconfirmed.

PZL 104 Wilga

Some said to have been delivered in the early 1970s. Unconfirmed.

Sukhoi Su-20 Fitter-C

Some Su-20 close support aircraft is said to have reached North Korea. Not confirmed.

Sukhoi Su-27 Flanker

Twenty reported in service in 1997, unlikely.

Tupolev Tu-2 Bat

Several Tu-2 light bombers were reportedly supplied before 1950. However, it is possible that the Tu-2’s all belonged to the Chinese PLAAF. Nine Tu-2s were shot down by US fighters during the war, eight of which on November 30, 1951. Thirty-five said to have been delivered in 1950, being withdrawn from use in 1968. Some said to have remained in service as late as 1958. Not confirmed.

Yakovlev Yak-3

No less than 70 said to have been received, beginning in 1948. Most likely a mis-identification with the Yak-9.

Yakovlev Yak-7B

Ten said to have been delivered for use as fighter trainers. Not confirmed.

Yakovlev Yak-11 Moose

One Yak-11 was claimed as shot down on 27 June 1950. No concrete information exists on Yak-11 basic trainers in North Korean service. It is possible that some Yak-11s were delivered during the 1950s for basic flight training, although confirmation of this is lacking.

Yakovlev Yak-15 Feather

One Yak-15 was claimed as shot down in 1953. Probably a mis-identification for the MiG-15.

Yakovlev Yak-16 Cork

No less than 22 said to have been delivered in 1950. Unconfirmed.

Yakovlev Yak-17UTI Magnet

Some two-seat Yak-17UTI conversion trainers said to have been delivered to the DPRKAF. Although a few Yak-17UTIs were exported to China, it is unlikely that any reached North Korea.

Yakovlev Yak-23 Flora

A contemporary of the MiG-15, some Yak-23s allegedly reached North Korea. Unconfirmed.

Aircraft Not Used

by the Lebanese Air Force


This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Lebanese Air Force but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

Aerospatiale AS332 Super Puma
Six examples were reportedly delivered in 1983.

Agusta AB204B
Some AB204Bs were reportedly in service 1968 to 1971.

Cessna O-1 Bird Dog
Some O-1s were reportedly in service 1966 to 1975.

de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth
Six Tiger Moths were reportedly donated by Iraq and used 1957-1966, but there is no evidence to support this.

Mikoyan MiG-29
Ten examples were offered by Russia in 2008, but during negotiations with the Lebanese Government in 2010 were replaced by Mi-24 helicopters.

Miles Magister
Two examples were reportedly in service at some time.

Mraz K-65 Cap
Some reports say that a few examples of the Czech-built version of the Fi-156 Storch, the K-65 Cap, were received in the late 1940s.

Aircraft Not Used
Kuwait Air Force

This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Kuwait Air Force but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

Agusta AB204B Iroquois
Six examples reported in service 1968-1978. Probably confusion with the AB205s actually used.

Boeing AH-64A Apache
16 ordered in 1994, but cancelled in 1996.

Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules
Four C-130J reportedly ordered in 2000.

Sikorsky UH-60L Blackhawk
16 ordered in 1996, but cancelled in 1997.

Aircraft Not Used
Qatar Emiri Air Force

This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Qatar Emiri Air Force but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

Aerospatiale SA330J Puma
Six examples reportedly in service 1981 to 1986.

Aerospatiale AS332F Super Puma
Six AS332F Super Pumas were reported to be in service 1982 to 1998.

Britten Norman BN-2A Islander
One example reportedly in use 1976 to 1988.

British Aerospace Hawk
A November 1996 order for 12 Hawk 100s was later cancelled.

Aircraft Not Used
Royal Jordanian Air Force

This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Royal Jordanian Air Force but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

MBB BK-117
Three BK-117s are reported to have been in RJAF service.

Piper PA-28 Cherokee
The Cherokees were actually operated by the Royal Jordanian Air Academy, not the Air Force.

Piper PA-34 Seneca
The Senecas were actually operated by the Royal Jordanian Air Academy, not the Air Force.

Short Sealand
Six(!) of the 25 Sealands built in total are sometimes reported to have been used by the RJAF.

Aircraft Not Used

by the Royal Bahraini Air Force


This page gives details of some of the aircraft types that were offered or promised to the Royal Bahraini Air Force but not delivered, cancelled official orders, and types have been falsely reported as being in service.

Boeing AH-64A Apache
In October 1990 the US Congress approved the supply of eight AH-64A attack helicopters to Bahrain, but the offer was declined. Sources: World Ar Power Journal Vol 5 Spring 1991 p.9, Worldmil (1996) p.51.

British Aerospace Hawk
In 1994, the BAAF came close to signing an order for the BAe Hawk, but chose to procure additional F-16s instead. Source: World Air Power Journal Vol 26 Autumn 1996 p.113

Lockheed C-130B Hercules
A deal to acquire two C-130B fell through in early 1994.

Lockheed Martin F-16N Fighting Falcon
During 1995-96 the BAAF considered buying 18 ex-US Navy F-16Ns, which had been retired from service in January 1995, but rejected the deal and eventually procured more new-build examples. Although much cheaper than surplus USAF F-16A/B aircraft, the F-16Ns had high fatigue counts and would require considerable upgrading to equip them to USAF F-16 standards. Source: World Air Power Journal Vol 23 Winter 1995 p.10 and World Air Power Journal Vol 27 Winter 1996 p.10.

Northrop F-20A Tigershark
Four F-20As were requested in 1982, along with two F-5Fs for conversion training, but the order size was insufficient to justify starting F-20 production and the US offered to supply F-5E aircraft instead. Source: World Air Power Journal Vol 25 Summer 1996 p.90.

The following aircraft types have been reported as serving with the BAAF, but actually serve with the Royal Flight:
Gulfstream II, Boeing 727, Boeing 747SP, Gulfstream III.

The following aircraft types have been reported as serving with the RBAF, but actually serve with the Bahrain Public Security Force: Westland Scout, Hughes 369D (‘Hughes 500D’), Sikorsky S-76, Bell 412, Bell 427 (‘Bell 430’).