Agusta-Bell AB206A JetRanger
in Armed Forces of Malta service

History

One AB.206A donated by Libya and delivered on 4 June 1973. Used for Search & Rescue duties. Sold in November 1997.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
9H-AAJ 8185 8185 1973 Sold as G-DNCN. New serial AS7305 not worn.

Pictures

AB.206A 9H-AAJ.
(photo: Peter Tonna via Roberto Benetti)

More Information

References

  • World Air Power Journal No.9
  • European Air Forces Directory 2001/02 (Mach III)
  • European Air Arms 2004 (Mach III)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2005/06 (Mach III)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2012/13 (Mach III)
  • Scramble Military Database

Other Sources

To be added.

Agusta-Bell AB47G
in Armed Forces of Malta service

History

Three AB.47G-2 donated by West Germany (ex-HEER) and delivered in May 1972. Used for patrol and Search & Rescue duties. Overhauled at Bergamo, Italy 1975-mid 1976. Two of the AB.47s were put into storage from 1997 and then sold.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
AS7201 225 74+02 May 1972 Initially serialled 9H-AAE.
9H-AAF 260 75+18 May 1972 New serial AS7302 not worn. wfu 1999. To F-GLNY Dec 2000.
9H-AAG 262 74+20 May 1972 New serial AS7303 not worn. wfu 20 Nov 1997. Sold to UAE Feb 1998.

Pictures

AB.47G-2 9H-AAF.
(photo: Estelle Calleja via armedforcesofmalta.com)

More Information

References

  • World Air Power Journal No.9
  • European Air Forces Directory 2001/02 (Mach III)
  • European Air Arms 2004 (Mach III)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2005/06 (Mach III)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2012/13 (Mach III)
  • Scramble Military Database

Other Sources

To be added.

Aerospatiale SA 316B Alouette III
in Armed Forces of Malta service

History

Three LARAF SA.316B Alouette IIIs were left behind by the Libyans after their hasty departure in August 1980. Unfortunately, they had to be put into storage as the Libyans had taken with them all the log books and maintenance records of these machines. On 11 June 1991, the missing documents were formally handed over to Malta, and in 1992 the three Alouettes were then sent abroad for overhaul. Two more Alouettes were acquired from Royal Netherlands Air Force in 1996, although some references describe these as SE3160 variants. Used for Patrol, Search and Rescue and Medical Evacuation duties.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
AS9315 2288 LC-2288 1992 Initially serialled 9H-AAV.
AS9211 2295 LC-2295 1992 Initially serialled 9H-AAW.
AS9212 2315 LC-2315 1992 Initially serialled 9H-AAX.
AS9617 1209 A-209 1996 Initially serialled 9H-ADA. stored Sept 2004
AS9618 1399 A-399 1996 Initially serialled 9H-ADB.

Pictures

Alouette III AS9211 at Luqa.
(photo: Pierre Gillard by courtesy of armedforcesofmalta.com)

More Information

References

  • World Air Power Journal No.9
  • Worldmil(1988)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2001/02 (Mach III)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2005/06 (Mach III)
  • European Air Forces Directory 2012/13 (Mach III)
  • Scramble Military Database

Other Sources

To be added.

National Markings
Armed Forces of Malta

This section describes and illustrates the various national insignia used by the Armed Forces of Malta Air Wing since its formation:



  
Main MarkingFin Flash

1973-1980 & 1988-1992
The first marking carried by the Helicopter Flight was the insignia of the First Regiment of the Armed Forces of Malta. This was a roundel of red over blue with a white ‘1’ in the centre. The main marking was displayed on the fuselage sides of the helicopters. No tail marking was carried. In 1980 the unit became part of the Malta Task Force and adopted the marking given below. On 1 May 1988 the unit reverted to the command of the First Regiment and the original marking, although some helicopters now also carried the Maltese national flag as a tail marking.



  

Main MarkingFin Flash

1980-1988
On 1st April 1980 the Helicopter Flight became part of the Malta Task Force and adopted a new roundel of a white over red disc with the letters ‘TF’ in black. No tail markings were carried. The main marking was displayed on the fuselage sides of the helicopters.



  
Main MarkingFin Flash

1992-present
In February 1992 a new roundel was introduced, featuring the national colours of red and white with a (red outlined) black representation of the George Cross in the centre. The national flag remained as the fin flash. The main marking is normally displayed on the fuselage sides of the helicopters, and in the standard six positions on aircraft. The first aircraft to carry this marking were the newly delivered Cessna O-1Es. The version on the Bulldog appears to have a slightly smaller George Cross in proportion to the overall size of the roundel. Aircraft do not carry service titles.

Narrative History
Armed Forces of Malta

Narrative Summary:
The defence of Malta was undertaken by Britain until its final withdrawal in March 1979. In the meantime, three Maltese Territorial Units were handed over to local control in April 1965 as the Malta Land Forces. Direct British military aid ended in October 1970. In 1970 plans to form a helicopter flight were formulated. West Germany offered to donate four Army helicopters in 1970, and in October of that year Maltese personnel were sent to Fassberg in Germany for training. The helicopters were delivered in May 1972, forming the initial equipment of the Malta Land Forces Helicopter Flight.

With the acquisition of some naval patrol boats, the Malta Land Forces were renamed the Armed Forces of Malta (AFM) in April 1973. The AFM was initially divided into two numbered Regiments, with the Helicopter Flight being attached to the First Regiment. Between 1973 and 1980 the Helicopter Flight received considerable technical and training assistance from Libya. On 1st April 1980, all units of the 1st Regiment, including the Helicopter Flight, became a component of a tactical unit within the AFM known as the Task Force, (the Task Force also included naval vessels and coastal artillery).

In 1981 an Italian Military Mission arrived to take over the role of training and providing technical advice. On 11 May 1988 the Task Force units were absorbed back into the AFM. In February 1992 the first fixed-wing aircraft were received – Cessna O-1Es. These aircraft were initially flown by Italian pilots while Maltese personnel were trained in Italy. On 22 July 1992, the Helicopter Flight was renamed the Air Squadron and re-assigned to the 2nd (Composite) Regiment of the AFM. On 31 October 2006 the Air Squadron was renamed the Air Wing, to reflect its increased responsibilities.