Eurocopter SA.365N Dauphin 2

in Icelandic Coast Guard Service

Key Facts

Total Delivered: 2
Service Entry: 1984
Retirement: In Service

History

One SA.365N obtained in 1984. Replaced the Sikorsky S-76. In 1985 replaced by another of the same type, also registered TF-SIF. Primarily used for search and rescue duties, with secondary coastal patrol and EMS roles.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
TF-SIF 6091 F-WXFJ 31 Jan 1984 CAA No.472, wfu 8 Aug 1985 to F-WYME, F-GEDQ etc
TF-SIF 6136 F-WYMM 27 Aug 1985 CAA No.496, ditched 16 July 2007 off Hafnarfjördur, probably w/o

Pictures

[Dauphin]
Aerospatiale Dauphin TF-SIF landing at Reykjavik Airport.
(Photo, Baldur Sveinsson)

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.


Fokker F27-200

in Icelandic Coast Guard Service

Key Facts

Total Delivered: 2
Service Entry: 1971
Retirement: In Service

History

One F.27-200 obtained in 1971 and registered TF-SYR (c/n 10260 ex PH-EXS). Loaned then sold to airline Icelandair from 12 December 1980 and subsequently to Switzerland as HB-ISH. Second F.27-200 obtained 14 January 1977 and registered TF-SYN (c/n 10545 ex PH-EXC). Still used for fishery protection duties. Equipped with underwing fuel tanks. Upgraded in 1987 with under-fuselage radome and updated equipment fit.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
TF-SYR 10260 PH-EXS 1971 CAA No.217, to Icelandair 12 Dec 1980 as TF-FLS.
TF-SYN 10545 PH-EXC 14 Jan 1977 CAA No.274

Pictures

[Fokker F.27]
TF-SYN in it’s original colours.
(Photo, Olafur Sigurdsson Collection)

[Fokker F.27]
TF-SYN takes off from Reykjavik Airport on April 6, 1998.
(Photo, Baldur Sveinsson)

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.

Grumman HU-16C Albatross

in Icelandic Coast Guard Service

Key Facts

Total Delivered: 2
Service Entry: 1969
Retirement: 1969

History

Two HU-16C’s borrowed from the US Coast Guard, January – May 1969, to replace the Catalina, but they proved very unreliable and were soon returned. One example had US Navy serial 141276. Used for fishery protection.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
1276 G-423 141276 Jan 1969 returned to USCG May 1969.
2361 G-368 142361 Jan 1969 returned to USCG May 1969

Pictures

[Albatross]
(Photo, Olafur Sigurdsson Collection)

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.

Hughes 500

in Icelandic Coast Guard Service

Key Facts

Total Delivered: 2
Service Entry: 1976
Retirement: 1986

History

One Hughes 369HS (“Hughes 500C”) obtained in 1976. Crash landed near Búrfell power plant 17 October 1980, but repaired and sold. Replaced by Hughes 500D with same registration. Withdrawn in early 1986 and replaced by the Ecureuil. Both equipped with floats. Main roles were support to the Cutters and light ships, and light transport duties.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
TF-GRO 1050773   7 April 1976 Hughes 369HS, CAA No.265, wfu 17 Nov 1980, to N26444, N500RT
TF-GRO 510975D   27 Oct 1981 Hughes 500D, CAA No.414, wfu 20 Jan 1986, to D-HISL

Pictures

[Hughes 500]
The first TF-GRO. (Photo, Eggert Norðdahl)

[Hughes 500]
The second TF-GRO. (Photo, Eggert Norðdahl)

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.

Sikorsky S-62

in Icelandic Coast Guard Service

Key Facts

Total Delivered: 1
Service Entry: 1972
Retirement: 1975

History

One S-62 (not S-62C) obtained from the US Coast Guard in 1972 – known as the HH-52A Seaguard in USCG service. Crashed and written off 3 October 1975, following an in-flight engine failure. Used for search and rescue and coastal patrol duties.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
TF-GNA 62-096 1411 July 1972 CAA No.222, w/o 3 Oct 1975.

Pictures

[HH-52A]
S-62 TF-GNA.
(Photo, Olafur Sigurdsson Collection)

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.

Sikorsky S-76

in Icelandic Coast Guard Service

Key Facts

Total Delivered: 1
Service Entry: 1976
Retirement: 1983

History

One S-76 (not 76A) delivered new in 1976. Lost in fatal accident 8 November 1983. Used for SAR missions, support to ICG Cutters and fishery patrol.

Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
TF-RAN 76-0081   1976 CAA No.385, w/o 8 Nov 1983.

Pictures

[S-76]
(Photo, Eggert Norðdahl)

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.

Iceland

Country Profile

The Country

Geography

Iceland is located in the north Atlantic, just south of the Arctic Circle, and is therefore Europe’s westernmost country. It’s position on the junction between the European and North American tectonic plates results in over 200 volcanoes (many of which are still active) and numerous geysers. The entire island is composed of volcanic rock, and features a large central plateau rising to an average height of 1000 m (3,281 ft), surrounded by a lower-lying coastal fringe where most of the settlements are found. Much of the coast has been eroded into deep fjords. A plain crossed by several rivers lies in the south west corner of the island, and here the capital city, Reykjavik, is situated. Some 60% of the population live in or near Reykjavik. The total land area of Iceland is 100,250 sq km (38,707 sq miles). The population numbered 277,000 in 2000. Icelanders are an ethnically homogenous society, descended from Norwegians and Celts. 93% of the population follow the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

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National History

Summary Narrative History

Timeline – Key Dates in Icelandic History

Further National Information

BBC News Profile: Denmark

Yahoo Iceland page
wikipedia: Iceland
wikipedia: History of Iceland
MILNET: Military Information on Iceland
Encyclopedia.com Iceland page
Cod Wars

Aviation

Text to be added on the development of aviation in Iceland.

Markings

Civil Aircraft Registrations

Civil aircraft in Iceland initially (from about 1930) received the country name ISLAND and a number. The registration prefix ‘TF-‘ has been used since 1937, eg: TF-ABW. Icelandic aircraft are also required to display their individual Icelandic CAA registration number externally – usually on the tail, eg: 216.
An illustrated database of TF- registered aircraft is here: The Icelandic Aircraft Database

Aircraft Operators

Military Air Arms

[No Icelandic Armed Forces]
US Armed Forces In Iceland

Central Government Agencies

Coast Guard Aviation (Icelandic Coast Guard)
State Soil Conservation Service (Landgraedsla Rikisins)

Public Service Aviation

No Police or EMS aviation.

Commercial Aviation

Air Atlanta
Air Iceland
Eagle Air
Flugfelag Austurlands
Flugfelagid Enir
Flugtak
Helicopter Service of Iceland
Icelandair Flugledir
Islandsflug
Loftleidir Icelandic [Ceased operations]

wikipedia: Airlines of Iceland
The World’s Airlines: Iceland

Private Aviation

No organisations known.

Industry

Aircraft Manufacturers

No aircraft manufacturing other than homebuilts.

Aircraft Maintenance/Repair Depots

None known.

Airfields

Civil Airports & Airfields

Air Bases and Airfields Listing
Airports in Iceland

Military Air Bases & Airfields

NAS Keflavik is the only military air base.

On Show

Aviation Museums

No dedicated aviation museum, but the following aircraft are preserved:

Olsen-Jónasson Ögnin TF-OGN in the waiting lounge in Keflavik Airport.
McDonnell F-4E Phantom “66-0300” gate guard at NAS Keflavik.
C-117D/R4D-8 17191 (c/n 43379) gate guard at Keflavik Airport.
DC-3 TF-ISB (c/n 9860) stored at Reykjavik (ex Icelandair).

Airshow Dates

Key Airshow Dates

More Information

Aviation-Related Magazines

No Icelandic aviation magazines known.

Aviation Bibliography

Icelandic Aviation Bibliography – to be added

Web Links

Icelandic Aero Web
Airlines, govt agencies, homebuilts etc

Airlines & Airports
Links to Icelandic aviation related websites

Icelandic Aviation
Photos, 1999 aircraft register, flight schools, links

Runar’s Icelandic Aircraft Web
Icelandic aviation pioneers, TF- database, leased aircraft, photos, links

Aviation Photos from Iceland
Selection of superb photos taken by Baldur Sveinsson.

Iceland Key Dates

874 AD    First Norwegian Viking settlers arrive.
930    World’s oldest surviving parliament, the Althing, established.
1000    Population converted to Christianity.
1262    Iceland formally united with Norway.
1380    Norway and Iceland come under Danish rule.
1800    The Althing is abolished.
1843    The Althing is re-established as a consultative body.
1874    New Icelandic constitution.
1904    Autonomy in all internal affairs introduced.
1 December 1918    Recognised as an independent state under the Danish crown.
1919    Icelandic Coast Guard begins operating around Iceland.
1940    Denmark invaded by Germany – constitutional links with Denmark cut.
10 May 1940    Iceland occupied by British troops.
July 1941    US forces take over defence of Iceland. Policy of neutrality abandoned.
17 June 1944    Iceland becomes a fully independent Republic.
1945    First international flights by Icelandic aircraft.
1946    Iceland joins United Nations.
4 April 1949    Founder member of NATO.
1958    Fishery limits extended to 12 nautical miles (22 km) – first ‘Cod War’ with UK.
1972    Fishery limits extended to 50 nautical miles (93 km) – second ‘Cod War’ with UK.
November 1975    200 nautical mile (370 km) fishing limit introduced – third ‘Cod War’ with UK.

Iceland National History


Although geographically separated from Europe, Iceland has been a port of call for mariners for many centuries. The first known inhabitants were a group of Irish monks, who arrived in the 9th century AD. In 874 Iceland was settled by Norwegian Vikings, many of whom were fleeing the harsh rule of Norwegian King Harald. The Irish monks moved away when the Vikings started to arrive.

In 930 the ruling chiefs established an annual parliament called the Althing – believed to be the world’s oldest surviving political assembly. In 1000 a civil war between Pagan and Christian groups was avoided when it was decided that the whole country would convert to Christianity. Iceland remained independent until 1262, when it entered into a union with the Norwegian monarchy. This union ended a bloody clan war which had started in 1220.

In 1380 Norway and Denmark were united, and so control of Iceland passed to Denmark. When the two kingdoms separated in 1814, Denmark kept Iceland as a dependency. In the early 19th century, an independence movement developed. Denmark granted Iceland home rule in 1874 under a new constitution. A revision of the constitution in 1903 established a minister for Icelandic Affairs, who was made responsible to the Althing.

The Act of Union of 1 December 1918 recognised Iceland as a fully sovereign state united with Denmark under a common king. Iceland established it’s own flag and delegated responsibility for foreign affairs and defence to Denmark.

The German occupation of Denmark on 9 April 1940 cut communications with Iceland. The next day the Althing voted to take control of foreign affairs – adopting a policy of strict neutrality in the war. Due to it’s vital strategic position, on 10 May 1940 British military forces invaded and occupied Iceland. With no military forces, resistance was impossible and a policy of collaboration with the occupying forces was soon adopted.

Under the United States-Icelandic defence agreement of July 1941, responsibility for Iceland’s defence passed to the USA. On 17 June 1944 Iceland formally became an independent republic, following a national referendum. In October 1946 it was agreed that US responsibility for the defence of Iceland would cease, but that it would have continued access to Keflavik airfield.

Iceland became a founder member of NATO on 4 April 1949, it’s main contribution being it’s strategically important airfields. Following the outbreak of the Korean war, and growing tensions in Europe, and an agreement was signed on 5 May 1951 under which the USA resumed responsibility for Iceland’s defence.

In 1958, the unilateral extension of Iceland’s fishery limits from 4 nautical miles (7 km) to 12 nautical miles (22 km), and thereby impinging on the traditional fishing grounds of British trawlers, led to the first ‘Cod War’ with Britain. Iceland was successful in it’s claim, and in 1972 further extended it’s fishery limits to 50 nautical miles (93 km). This resulted in a second ‘Cod War’ which was resolved in 1973 by an agreement on annual catch sizes. A third and more serious ‘Cod War’ broke out in November 1975 when the 1973 agreement expired and Iceland introduced a 200 nautical mile (370 km) fishery limit. This was eventually settled diplomatically in June 1976.

ISMO

Aviation-related Magazines Guide

‘ISMO’ appears to have been an annual publication for members of IPMS Iceland, covering various scale modelling topics. The years of publication are not known, but the 1976 issue included an illustrated feature on Icelandic Coast Guard Aviation. Ceased publication at an unknown date. One of the main contributors was aviation author Ragnar J. Ragnarsson.

Further information:
IPMS Iceland no longer exists.