Panama SEC McDonnell Douglas 500E Defender

In Panamanian National Aeronaval Service use

History

Used by the 2do Escuadrón Aéreo.


Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
111(2) n/a n/a 2008  


Pictures

None at present.

More Information

References

  • World Air Forces Directory 2004/2005 (Ian Carroll)

Other Sources

To be added.

McDonnell-Douglas DC-10

in Paraguayan Air Force Service

History

Used by Líneas Aéreas Paraguayas.


Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
N602DC 46976 N8712Q, C-GXRB, EI-BZD 6.1992 leased until 1994
F-BTDB 46850 N1341U 11.1992 leased until 6.1994
PP-VMX 47845   10.1993 leased until 1.1994


Pictures

None available at present.

More Information

References

Other Sources

To be added.

McDonnell Douglas MD 500E

in Costa Rican Ministry of Public Security service

History

Used by the Escuadrilla de Helicópteros.


Individual Details

Serial c/no. Prev. Identity Delivered Fate/Notes
MSP-010(3) n/a n/a 10.1985 crashed at Palmar South on 2.8.1996


Pictures

None available at present.

More Information

References

  • Latin-American Military Aviation (John Andrade)

Other Sources

To be added.

Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

Aircraft Profile
C-17A 99-1189 seen at London, Ontario
(photo, Alex Petrovic)

Development

The portly but manoeuvreable C-17 has emerged from a prolonged and controversial development programme to become the backbone of the USAF’s strategic transport force. In trouble spots and disaster zones around the world, C-17s are often seen delivering equipment and supplies wherever they are needed.

The development of the C-17 began in February 1980 when a draft Request For Proposals (RFP) was issued by the US Air Force for a CX heavylift cargo transport. In October this document was formally issued. The RFP required an aircraft for the strategic airlift role, replacing the C-141 Starlifter and supplanting the C-5 Galaxy. It would have a fuselage cross-section sized to carry outsized loads such as an M1 Abrams main battle tank, suitable undercarriage and high-lift devices to enable it to perform short-field landings and thrust reversers to enhance manoeuvring on the ground.

CX designs were proposed by Boeing, Lockheed and the Douglas Aircraft division of McDonnell-Douglas. Douglas’s design drew upon the experience it had gained during the design and testing of the YC-15 jet-powered tactical transport which was intended to replace the C-130 Hercules. First flown in August 1975, the YC-15 never entered production. On 28 August 1981 the Douglas design was announced as the CX winner and the designation C-17 subsequently assigned. By early 1984 detail design was almost finalised and a full scale fuselage mock-up was constructed to evaluate cargo loading capability for different load combinations. In February 1985 a contract was placed for a C-17 prototype. A total buy of 210 airframes was anticipated at this time. However, Douglas’s lack of recent experience in managing complex military aircraft programmes soon showed as programmes milestones began to slip repeatedly, sub-contractors were changed and the estimated weight if the aircraft continued to rise. Costs vastly exceeded initial estimates and in April 1990 the planned production run was cut from 210 to 120 aircraft to save money.

In September 1990 the C-17A prototype (87-0025), referred to as T-1 because of it’s test role, was towed out of the factory at Long Beach, CA, to undergo fuselage pressure testing. Two other test airframes, T-2 for ‘static’ load testing and T-3 for ‘durability’ cyclic fatigue testing were not assigned military serial numbers. On 15 September 1991, T-1 made it’s first flight – actually a ferry flight to Edwards AFB where it was accepted by the 6510th Test Wing. Shortly afterwards, a major problem emerged back at Long Beach when the T-2 airframe suffered a wing structural failure at a loading condition much less severe that had been forecast. The necessary structural strengthening would add a further 1% to the weight of the wing. The first production C-17A (88-0265), referred to as P-1, made its first flight on 19 May 1992, joining T-1 at Edwards AFB the same day. P-2, the second production aircraft, featured a production standard avionics fit and made its first flight on 20 June 1992. After its problematic development programme, the flight test programme proceeded remarkably smoothly with virtually all test objectives being achieved on time.

The name Globemaster III was officially applied to the C-17 on 5 February 1993 by the head of Air Mobility Command General Ronald R. Fogleman. The first unit to operate the C-17 was the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston AFB, SC, which received its first aircraft on 14 June 1993. Within months of achieving Initial Operational Capability (IOC) entering service, in mid December 1995 the 437th deployed 12 of its C-17s to Rhein Main, Germany to take part in the huge airlift operation required to establish IFOR peacekeeping forces in Bosnia. The benefits of the C-17 were immediately apparent, as it carried much of the US Army’s heavy equipment into Tuzla Airport, where the C-5A was too heavy to operate safely. The reduced ramp space taken up by the C-17 compared to the C-5 was also appreciated.

During the 1999 Kosovo War a detachment of C-17s from the 437th AW operated dozens of tactical airlift flights into Tirana in Albania from Ramstein AB in Germany, while other C-17s flew strategic airlift missions between the USA and Europe. Overall, C-17s contributed 60% of the total ALLIED FORCE transport missions, but comprised only 10% of the USAF airlift fleet.

On 16 May 2000 the British Ministry of Defence announced that it had chosen the C-17 to meet its requirement for the strategic transport of outsize loads. Four aircraft would be obtained on a 7 year lease from Boeing. The aircraft were built to Block XII standard incorporating an additional 10,000 US gal (37053 litre) fuel tank in the wing centre section, redesigned cockpit multi-function displays (MFDs) and updated navigation software. The first RAF aircraft (ZZ171) was handed over to 99 Sqn on 17 May 2001 and flown to its new base at RAF Brize Norton, Oxfordshire six days later. The fourth and last aircraft arrived on 24 August 2001. Training and logistic support for the RAF aircraft is provided by the USAF. The British C-17s faced their first major challenge when they took part in the Joint Rapid Reaction Force exercise ‘Saif Sareea II’ in Oman during October 200l. Such was the C-17’s effectiveness that the initial limited number of exercise flights was rapidly increased. Not long afterwards, RAF C-17s were making regular supply runs into Kabul to support operations in Afghanistan. 99 Squadron was also heavily committed to ferrying equipment prior to the Iraq war and still continues to make regular flights into Iraq direct from the UK. The expected annual usage rate for the British C-17s had been 3000 hours, but these aircraft are now seeing over 6000 hours usage and the acquisition of an additional aircraft is now planned.

While air strikes on Taliban/al-Qaeda forces in Afghanistan were being carried out by Allied air forces, USAF C-17s were busy providing a continuous airlift of supplies to the various coalition bases. At night C-17s dropped more than 2.4 million food parcels to Afghan civilians displaced by the fighting. During Operation Iraqi Freedom, in March 2003, C-17s carried the 173rd Airborne Brigade from Italy into Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq, for a 1000-troop night parachute drop. This was the first combat insertion of paratroopers using a C-17.

In FY2000 an order was placed for 15 additional aircraft to fulfill the Special Operations Low Level (SOLL) II mission, replacing aging C-141B aircraft. Since the start of series production, the manufacturer had been making strenuous efforts to reduce the unit cost of production C-17 aircraft and this effort was rewarded when the acquisition of a further 60 C-17As was officially approved on 15 August 2002. Even this additional number may not be sufficient to meet demand and further orders may eventually be forthcoming.

From the outside, the C-17 reveals little of its high technology design. It appears to be a conventional high-wing, four engined T-tailed jet transport. Inside it is a different story. The two-crew cockpit features digital displays and head-up displays. The aircraft is flown using a fighter-style control stick instead of the traditional yoke used on transport aircaft. The flying controls are managed by a quadruply redundant Fly-By-Wire control system with mechanical backup that operates 29 control surfaces – including an all-moving tailplane, two rudders, two ailerons, eight spoilers, four flaps and eight slats.

The supercritical aerofoil section wing is swept at 25º and features prominent winglets, which improve aerodynamic efficiency at the wing tips. Hung off the wing on cantilevered pylons are four Pratt & Whitney PW2040 turbofan engines. Based on the engines used on the Boeing 757, they are known by the military designation F117-PW-100. Each engine nacelle includes a thrust reverser, whereby a section of the engine cowling slides backwards to allow engine exhaust to be directed upward and forward. This function gives the C-17 the ability to complete a 180 º turn on a 90 ft (27.86 m) wide runway and to be able to reverse up a 2 per cent slope.

The positions of the engines allows the use of propulsive lift technology, first tested on the YC-15, in which the engine exhaust is trapped under the wing and forced to flow over both sides of the single split flap on the wing trailing edge. The exhaust then leaves the flap trailing edge at an angle related to the flap deflection. A full span leading edge slat helps the wing maintain optimum lift and stall characteristics. The combination of the features allows a steep, low speed final approach with a low landing speed.

The bulk of the fuselage is taken up with the cargo hold, which features a palletised load/unload system which can be handled by a single loadmaster. Powered rollers allow up to 18 standard 463L pallets to be accommodated in the 68 ft 1.5 in (21.11 m) long cargo compartment. The width and height available permits odd shaped cargo such as helicopters to be accepted with the minimum of preparation.

Attached to the fuselage are the low-drag pods for the main landing gear. The non-steerable six wheel per side main units spread the load to permit operation from most concrete hard standing areas. The steerable dual wheel nose gear retracts into the forward fuselage. An Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) in the starboard main gear fairing provides electrical power when the engines are not running.

Boeing’s hi-tech military airlifter is the right aircraft at the right time. As the rapid deployment of military forces or humanitarian relief aid becomes an ever more crucial capability, the C-17s proven ability to carry outsize loads into austere airfields is a vital asset which will ensure it remains a vital component of the USAFs inventory for many years to come.

P-120 03-3120 leaving Long Beach
(photo, James Richard Covington, Jr)
ZZ174 on approach to Birmingham Airport
(photo, Derek Pedley/Airteamimages.com)

Variants

Requirement Specification: CX
Manufacturers Designation:

Development History:
CX Initial project designation.
C-17A First prototype (T-1). Nose pitot boom. Reduced avionics fit.
C-17A Block I to XI Standard production version. P-1 to P-5 for development testing. P-13+ with interim strengthend wing, P-32+ with redesigned stronger wing structure, P-51+ with composite tailplane and improved avionics.
C-17A Block XII Improved production version (P-71+) with centre section wing fuel tank for extend range. Upgraded software and redesigned cockpit MFDs.
C-17A SOLL II Special Operations Low Level (SOLL) II variant to replace C-141B SOLL II.
EC-17 Projected airborne command post version to replace EC-135.
KC-17 Proposed tanker version. Additional fuel in wing centre tank and/or modular palletised tank in fuselage. Total capacity 165,513 litres. Refuelling boom and/or hose drum unit integated into rear cargo ramp door plus optional underwing pods. Operators station on modular pallet.
MD-17 Proposed dedicated commercial freighter variant.
BC-17X Proposed designation for commercially operated C-17A, subsidised by DoD to be available to USAF in time of crisis.
60002 on finals to Rhein-Main
(photo, David James Clelford)
01-0189 leaving Sydney Airport
(photo, Joe Corrigan)

History

Key Dates:
Feb 1980    Draft RFP issued for CX heavylift cargo transport.
Oct 1980    Formal issue of RFP for CX programme.
28 August 1981    McDonnell Douglas chosen as CX prime contractor.
26 July 1982    C-17 Research and Development contract placed.
early 1984    Detailed design completed.
Feb 1985    Contract placed to built a C-17 prototype.
31 Dec 1985    Full Scale Development (FSD) contract signed.
April 1990    Planned requirement reduced from 210 to 120 airframes.
15 Sept 1991    Maiden flight of first prototype (T-1)
1 Oct 1991    Static test airframe experiences wing structural failure at less than predicted maximum load.
19 May 1992    First flight of first production aircraft (P-1).
1 June 1992    Military Airlift Command becomes Air Mobility Command.
14 June 1993    First delivery to 17th AS, 437th AW.
17 Jan 1995    17th AS attains IOC (Initial Operational Capability)
3 November 1995    Multi-year order for 80 C-17s placed by DAB
Dec 1995    C-17s participate in major airlift of equipment to Tuzla in Bosnia
1997    Boeing takes over McDonnell Douglas
16 May 2000    UK selects C-17 for strategic airlift role
2 Sept 2000    UK signs 7-year lease for four C-17s
17 May 2001    First C-17 handed over to 99 Sqn RAF
15 Aug 2002    Contract signed for 60 additional C-17s
02-1110 approaching Rhein-Main AB
(photo, Oliver Brunke)
Good upper view of 03-3115
(photo, Sam Chui)

Operators

Military Operators

Royal Air Force 4 C-17A (planned total 5)
United States Air Force 180 C-17A (planned total 200+)

Government Agencies

None

Civilian Operators

None
03-03120 on pre-delivery test flight
(photo, Micheal Carter)
00-0185 landing at Rhein-Main AB
(photo, Francisco José Jurado Ariza)

Specifications

Boeing C-17A Globemaster III
Accomodation: Three crew + 102 troops/paratroopers
Dimensions: Length 174 ft 0 in (53.04 m); Height 55 ft 1 in (16.79 m); Wing Span 169 ft 9 in (51.74 m) to winglet tips; Wing Area 3,800 sq ft (353.03 sq m)
Engines: Four Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 (PW2040) turbofans rated at 40,440 lb st (179.9 kN)
Weights: Empty 277,000 lb (125,645 kg); Maximum Ramp 586,000 lb (265,805 kg); Maximum Take-off 585,000 lb (265,351 kg); Maximum Payload 170,400 lb (77,292 kg) for 2.25 g limit
Performance: Max level speed Mach 0.875, Maximum Cruising Speed 350kts (403 mph, 648 kph) at low altitude; Service ceiling 45,000 ft (13,715 m); Range with 160,000 lb (72575 kg) payload no allowances 2,400 nm (2,765 miles, 4445 km), Range with maximum fuel no payload no allowances 4,700 nm (5,412 miles, 8710 km)
Fly-by from 10197 with the cargo door open
(photo, Paul Leach)
00-0173 at Rhein-Main AB
(photo, Snorre-VIP)

Production

Design Centre

Head of Design Team: Not known
Design Offices: Boeing Military Aircraft, Long Beach, California

Manufacture

Boeing Military Aircraft
(Building 54, Long Beach Airport, CA)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
C-17A (T-1) 1 Long Beach 1987-1991
C-17A (P-1+) 40 Long Beach 1988-1997
C-17A (P-41+) 80 Long Beach 1997-Nov 2004
C-17A (UK-1+) 4 Long Beach 2000-Aug 2001
C-17A (P-121+) 60 Long Beach 2004-2010
Total: 185    

Total Produced: 185 a/c (all variants)
[In addition, two complete airframes where built for static and dynamic load testing, T-2 & T-3].
(Tailplane and fin built by Northrop Grumman in Dallas, Cockpit from Boeing St Louis)

Production List

To be added.

Cargo hold of ZZ171 looking aft
(photo, Jim Woodrow)
ZZ172/00-0202 seen at Hanover
(photo, MR)

More Information

Books

‘Boeing C-17 Globemaster III (Warbird Tech Volume 30)’ [Order this book from UK]
by Bill Norton
Speciality Press, 5 July 2001   ISBN: 158007040X
* Well illustrated history.

‘STOL Progenitors: The Technology Path to a Large STOL Aircraft and the C-17’ [Order this book from UK]
by Bill Norton
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nov 2002   ISBN: 1563475766
* Story of the evolution of the technology used in the C-17.

Magazines

Air Forces Monthly January 2000
Air International July 2004

Links

C-17 Globemaster III
* Detailed C-17 profile including history, production, data, photos etc

The Aviation Zone
* 14 pages of C-17 photos

C-17A Globemaster III Walkaround
* A page of close-up detail photos of a C-17A

Airliners.net
* 26 Pages of excellent C-17 photos.

Boeing C-17
* Boeing’s official C-17 wesbite.

Shop

Flight Simulator Models:
To be added.

Scale Models:
To be added.

Scale Drawings:
To be added.

Videos:

To be added.

Boeing F/A-18 Hornet

Aircraft Profile
Canadian CF-188A “917”. Seen at the London, Canada air show 1999.

Development

The F/A-18 Hornet is an all-weather aircraft used as both an attack and fighter aircraft. As a fighter, the Hornet is used as a fighter escort and for fleet air defense. In its attack role, it is used for interdiction and air support.

The F/A-18 Hornet is a twin engine, mid-wing, multi-role tactical aircraft. The F/A-18A and C are single seat aircraft and the F/A-18B and D are two-seaters. While the B aircraft is used mainly for training the D version is the current Navy aircraft performing the forward air control, reconnaissance, tactical air control and attack roles. The latest E and F models were rolled out in September 1995. The E being the single seater.

The F/A-18 Hornet was designed to meet a requirement for a multi-role combat aircraft to replace the ground attack role of the A-7 Corsair, and the air defense and ground attack role of the F-4 Phantom. It also had to be a low cost complement to the F-14 Tomcat and be able to operate from forward airstrips for the US Marine Corps.

The Hornets origins go back to the 1960’s and Northrop’s Light-Weight Fighter project that eventually led to the YF-17 prototype. The YF-17’s first flight was on 9th June 1974. After the YF-16 was chosen by the USAF, US Congress decided to evaluate two aircraft for the Naval Air Combat Fighter (ACF) project. The YF-17 was not initially designed for carrier operation, so Northrop collaborated with McDonnell Douglas to win the competition with General Dynamics and LTV. After modifications by the two companies, the YF-17 became “model 267” and on 2nd May 1975, the US Navy declared the aircraft the winner. It is from this point that the Hornet becomes a McDonnell Douglas aircraft as they were the prime contractors. Originally there were two types – the F-18 and the A-18, but a Defense Systems Acquisition Review decided, on 8th December 1982, to call the aircraft the F/A-18. It is the only aircraft in services with US forces to have a dual designation. On 1st January 1977, Secretary of the Navy, W. Graham Claytor decided to call the F/A-18 “Hornet” after the USN ships with the same name.

The Hornet has been regularly upgraded since entering service in 1983. The first F/A-18’s equipped with night strike capability were delivered in November 1989. Since 1991, they have had F404-GE-402 enhanced performance engines fitted and since May 1994, the Hornet has been fitted with upgraded APG-73 radar.

Canada was the first export customer for the Hornet and it has the largest fleet of Hornets outside the US. The Canadian F/A-18’s are designated CF-188 by that country.

Variants

Requirement Specification: ?
Manufacturers Designation: ?

Development History:
YF-17 First prototype manufactured by Northrop and competed against YF-16 in the USAF competition.
YF-17 model 267 Northrop/McDonnell Douglas joint prototype.
F-18 Initial designation of dedicated fighter version.
A-18 Initial designation of dedicated strike/attack version.
F/A-18 Revised designation when common airframe selected for both fighter and attack missions. McDonnell Douglas led programme.
YF/A-18A Unofficial designation for the first nine single-seat development aircraft.
F/A-18A First model in the Hornet range of single seat fighter attack aircraft.
TF-18A Initial designation of F/A-18B two-seater.
F/A-18B Two seat, dual-control variant of the ‘A’ model. Combat capable but only used for training.
F/A-18L The ‘L’ refers to this being a ‘Land’ variant of the F/A-18A. Northrop led programme. It never went into production.
TF/A-18L Two seat, dual-control variant of the ‘L’ model.
RF-18A Initial designation for F/A-18(R).
F/A-18(R) Planned reconnaissance version of the production F/A-18A, with recce camera system replacing M61A1 cannon in bulged nose. One test aircraft converted. Development cancelled.
CF-18A McDonnell Douglas designation for single seat version for the Canadian Armed Forces. Fitted with spotlight on port side of nose.
CF-188A Canadian Armed Forces designation for single seat version.
CF-18B McDonnell Douglas designation for two seat version for Canada.
CF-188B Canadian Armed Forces designation for two seat version.
AF-18A Single seat version for the R.A.A.F.
AF-18B Two seat version for R.A.A.F. Also referred to as the ATF-18A.
EF-18A Single seat version for the Spanish Air Force. Designated C.15 by the Spanish.
EF-15B Two seat version for the Spanish Air Force. Designated CE.15 in Spain.
F/A-18C Improved and updated version of the ‘A’ model. Revised and updated avionics fit, Martin Baker NACES ejection seat, ability to fire AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles, addition of small strakes on wing LERXs.
F/A-18C Night Attack Improved version with colour cockpit displays, night vision goggles compatible cockpit and external FLIR pod.
F/A-18C Night Attack Late production F/A-18C aircraft (June 1994 onwards) have AN/APG-73 radar in place of the previous AN/APG-65 unit.
F/A-18D Two seat combat capable version of the ‘C’ model.
F/A-18D+ Original designation for F/A-18D Night Attack.
F/A-18D Night Attack F/A-18D with night attack avonics fit from FA-18C Night Attack. Dedicated attack aircraft. Rear cockpit has sidestick weapons controllers in place of control column.
F/A-18D(RC) Reconnaissance Capable version of F/A-18D with wiring for ATARS recce pod. Retains night attack mission capability.
KAF-18C/D Unofficial designation for the F/A-18C and D Hornets supplied to the Kuwaiti Air Force.
F/A-18E Super Hornet Enlarged version of F/A-18C to replace F-14 Tomcat. Lengthened fuselage, larger wing and tailplane, rectangular air intakes for new F404 engines but F/A-18C standard avionics fit.
F/A-18F Super Hornet Two seat combat capable version of F/A-18E.
F/A-18G “Growler” Projected Electronic Warfare version of F/A-18D to replace EA-6B Prowler.

History

Key Dates:
9th June 1974    First flight of YF-17.
2nd May 1975    YF-17 Model 267 declared winner of competition.
1st March 1977    Named “Hornet” by the Secretary of the Navy.
18 November 1978    Maiden flight of first F/A-18A.
May 1980    First deliveries to US Navy operational test and evaluation force.
August 1982    First deliveries to a service unit – VMFA-314.
7 January 1983    VMFA-314 declared operational.
15 August 1984    Maiden flight of F/A-18(R) test aircraft.
3 September 1986    Maiden flight of first F/A-18C.
1 November 1989    Delivery of first F/A-18C Night Attack version.
15 April 1992    Maiden flight of first AN/APG-73 equipped F/A-18C.
1987    ‘Blue Angels’ aerial display team debut with the F/A-18.
29 November 1995    Maiden flight of first F/A-18E Super Hornet.
late 1998    First production delivery of F/A-18E/F to US Navy.
2002    First carrier air wing cruise for F/A-18E/F.
EF/A-18A C.15-36 from Ala 15 of the Spanish Air
Force. (photo, Anthony Noble)

Operators

Military Operators

U.S. Navy & Reserve (31 Sqns with F/A-18A/B/C/D, 2 Sqns with F/A-18E/F)
U.S. Marine Corps & Reserve (21 Sqns. with F/A-18A/C/D)
Australia – Air Force (4 Sqns. with 57 AF-18A and 18 AF-18B)
Canada – Armed Forces (5 Sqns. with 98 CF-188A and 40 CF-188B)
Finland – Air Force (57 F/A-18C and 7 F/A-18D)
Kuwait – Air Force (2 Sqns. with 32 KAF-18C and 8 KAF-18D)
Malaysia – Air Force (8 F/A-18D)
Spain – Air Force (4 Sqns with 60 EF-18A and 12 EF-18B)
Switzerland – Air Force (26 F/A-18C and 8 F/A-18D)

Government Agencies

NASA F/A-18B

Civilian Operators

None  

Specifications

Boeing F/A-18A Hornet
Crew: One (Two in F/A-18B)
Dimensions: Length 56 ft 0 in (17.07 m); Height 15 ft 3.5 in (4.66 m); Wing Span 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m) without wingtip AAMs, 40 ft 4.75 in (12.31 m) with wingtip AAMs; Wing Area 400.00 sq ft (37.16 sq m)
Engines: Two General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofans each rated at 16,000 lb st (71.17 kN) with afterburning
Weights: Empty Equipped 28,600 lb (12,973 kg); Normal Take-off 33,585 lb (15,234 kg) on a fighter mission; Maximum Take-off 48,253 lb (21,888 kg) for an attack mission
Performance: Maximum level speed ‘clean’ 1,033+ kts (1,190 mph, 1915 kph) at high altitude; Maximum rate of climb at sea level 45,000 ft/min (13715 m/min); Combat ceiling 50,000 ft (15,240 m); Ferry range with drop tanks 1,800+ nm (2,073 mls, 3,336 km); Combat radius on a fighter mission 400 nm (460 mls, 740 km) or 575 nm (662 mls, 1065 km) on an attack mission
Armament: M61A1 20-mm Vulcan cannon in the nose with 570 rounds in a drum tank located below the gun and behind the radar. Four AIM-9M Sidewinders carried on the sides of the wing pylons, two on each side. (This arrangement allows a drop tank or bombs to be carried at the same time). Up to 15,500 lb (7030 kg) of bombs, fuel tanks and missiles can be carried on 9 external stores stations – four wing pylons, 2 engine nacelle ‘corner’ stations, one fuselage centre-line hardpoint and one launch rail on each wingtip.
Boeing F/A-18C Hornet
Crew: One (Two in F/A-18D)
Dimensions: Length 56 ft 0 in (17.07 m); Height 15 ft 3.5 in (4.66 m); Wing Span 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m) without wingtip AAMs, 40 ft 4.75 in (12.31 m) with wingtip AAMs; Wing Area 400.00 sq ft (37.16 sq m)
Engines: Two General Electric F404-GE-400 turbofans each rated at 16,000 lb st (71.17 kN) with afterburning or (early 1992+ production) F404-GE-402 turbofans each rated at 17,700 lb st (78.73 kN) with afterburning
Weights: Empty 23,050 lb (10,455 kg); Normal Take-off 36,710 lb (16,652 kg) for a fighter mission or 51,900 lb (23,541 kg) for an attack mission; Maximum Take-off 56,000 lb (25,401 kg)
Performance: Maximum level speed ‘clean’ 1,033+ kts (1,190 mph, 1915 kph) at high altitude; Maximum rate of climb at sea level 45,000 ft/min (13715 m/min); Combat ceiling 50,000 ft (15,240 m); Ferry range with drop tanks 1,800+ nm (2,073 mls, 3,336 km); Combat radius on a fighter mission 400 nm (460 mls, 740 km) or 575 nm (662 mls, 1065 km) on an attack mission
Armament: M61A1 20-mm Vulcan cannon in the nose with 570 rounds in a drum tank located below the gun and behind the radar. Four AIM-9M Sidewinders carried on the sides of the wing pylons, two on each side. (This arrangement allows a drop tank or bombs to be carried at the same time). Up to 15,500 lb (7030 kg) of bombs, fuel tanks and missiles can be carried on 9 external stores stations – four wing pylons, 2 engine nacelle ‘corner’ stations, one fuselage centre-line hardpoint and one launch rail on each wingtip.
Boeing F/A-18E Super Hornet
Crew: One (Two in F/A-18F)
Dimensions: Length 60 ft 1.25 in (18.31 m); Height 15 ft 9.5 in (4.82 m); Wing Span 41 ft 10.25 in (12.76 m) without wingtip AAMs, 44 ft 8.5 in (13.62 m) with wingtip AAMs; Wing Area 500.00 sq ft (37.16 sq m)
Engines: Two General Electric F414-GE-400 turbofans each rated at 22,000 lb st (97.86 kN) with afterburning
Weights: Empty Equipped 30,600 lb (13,880 kg); Maximum Take-off 66,000 lb (29,937 kg)
Performance: Maximum level speed ‘clean’ 1,033+ kts (1,190 mph, 1915 kph) at high altitude; Combat ceiling 50,000 ft (15,240 m); Combat radius on an attack mission 591 nm (681 mls, 1095 km).
Armament: M61A1 20-mm Vulcan cannon in the nose with 570 rounds in a drum tank located below the gun and behind the radar. Four AIM-9M Sidewinders carried on the sides of the wing pylons, two on each side. (This arrangement allows a drop tank or bombs to be carried at the same time). Up to 17,750 lb (8050 kg) of bombs, fuel tanks and missiles can be carried on 11 external stores stations – six wing pylons, 2 engine nacelle ‘corner’ stations, one fuselage centre-line hardpoint and one launch rail on each wingtip.

Production

Design Centre

Head of Design Team: ?
Programme Manager: ?
Design Office: McDonnell Douglas Corporation, St Louis, Missouri.

Manufacture

McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Corporation (MCAir)
(Box 516, St Louis, MO 63166, USA. Later Boeing Military Aircraft)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F/A-18A/B EMD 9/2 St Louis, MO 1978-March 1980
F/A-18A 371 St Louis, MO 1980-1986
F/A-18B 40 St Louis, MO 1980-1986
CF-18A 98 St Louis, MO 1982-Sept 1988
CF-18B 40 St Louis, MO 1982-Sept 1988
EF-18A 60 St Louis, MO 1986-1990
EF-18B 12 St Louis, MO 1986-1990
F/A-18C 355 St Louis, MO 1986-1998
F/A-18C Swiss 2 St Louis, MO 1994-1995
F/A-18D 80+ St Louis, MO 1986-1985
F/A-18D Fin 7 St Louis, MO 1994-1995
F/A-18D Malay 8 St Louis, MO 1996-1997
KAF-18C 32 St Louis, MO 1992-Sept 1993
KAF-18D 8 St Louis, MO 1992-Sept 1993
F/A-18E EMD 5* St Louis, MO 1995-1997
F/A-18F EMD 2 St Louis, MO 1995-1996
F/A-18E 500+ St Louis, MO Sept 1997-2015
F/A-18F 500+ St Louis, MO Sept 1997-2015
Total: ?    

* 3 ground test airframes also manufactured.

ASTA – Aerospace Technologies of Australia
(ASTA, Avalon, Victoria, Australia)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
AF-18A 57* Avalon 1984-1990
AF-18B 18* Avalon 1984-1990
Total: 75    

* First few a/c assembled from St Louis components.

Valmet
(Valmet, Tampere, Finland – later Finavitec)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F/A-18C 57* Tampere 1995-2000
Total: 57    

* All aircraft assembled from St Louis components. 7 F/A-18D also supplied direct from St Louis.

F+W
(F+W, Emmen, Switzerland)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F/A-18C 24* Emmen 1995-1997
F/A-18D 8* Emmen 1995-1997
Total: 32    

* All aircraft assembled from St Louis components. 2 F/A-18C also supplied direct from St Louis.

Total Produced: 1478 a/c

Production List

Boeing F/A-18 (Super) Hornet
(Last updated April 2001)

More Information

Books

‘How to Fly and Fight in the F/A-18 Hornet – Jane’s At the Controls, No.2.’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by David C. Isby
Published by HarperCollins, Dec 1997 ISBN: 0 00472 009 1
* Pilots-eye view of the F/A-18.

‘F/A-18 Hornet – A Navy Success Story’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Dennis R Jenkins & Shelley Carr
Published by McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, 31 May 2000 ISBN: 0 07134 696 1
* Good development history. Aviation Week Series.

‘Warbird Tech Vol. 31: Boeing F/A-18 Hornet’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Brad Elward
Published by Speciality Press, 5 July 2001 ISBN: 1 58007 041 8
* Detailed development history with extracts from offical technical manuals.

‘McDonnell Douglas F-18 Hornet – A Photo Chronicle’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Bill Holder & Mike Wallace
Published by Schiffer Publishing, April 1997 ISBN: 0 76430 243 4
* Good pictorial history.

‘F/A-18 Hornet Walkaround’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Lindsay Peacock
Published by Squadron/Signal, June 1999 ISBN: 0 89747 401 5
* Close-up pictorial of external and internal features.

‘F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet Units in Operation Iraqi Freedom (Osprey Combat Aircraft No.46)’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Tony Holmes
Published by Osprey Publishing, 1 July 2004 ISBN: 1 84176 801 4
* Up-to-date coverage of the F/A-18 in combat.

‘Uncovering The Boeing F/A-18 A/B/C/D Hornet’
by Danny Coremans, Nico Deboeck
Published by Daco Publications, July 2004 ISBN: 9 08067 473 7
* Features 700+ colour photos of internal and external details plus scale drawings.

‘The “Air Forces Monthly” Book of the F/A-18 Hornet’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Tim Senior
Published by Key Books Ltd, 26 May 2003 ISBN: 0 94621 969 9
* Highly illustrated profile with good coverage of history, combat use and operators.

‘World Air Power Journal, Volume 1’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by Aerospace Publishing Ltd, May 1990 ISBN: 1 87402 300 X
* Includes ‘Focus Aircraft’ feature on the F/A-18A/B Hornet.

‘World Air Power Journal, Volume 26’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by Aerospace Publishing Ltd, July 1996 ISBN: 1 87402 382 4
* Includes ‘Focus Aircraft’ feature on the F/A-18C/D Hornet.

‘World Air Power Journal, Volume 42’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by Aerospace Publishing Ltd, Nov 1990 ISBN: 1 86184 051 9
* Includes feature on the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.

Magazines

To be added.

Links

F/A-18 Hornet
(US Navy Factfile – basic information)

Super Hornet
(Links to some official US Navy info & pics for the F/A-18E/F)

F/A-18 Hornet
(Good overview with specs, pics and links)

F/A-18 Hornet
(Official Boeing F/A-18 page – news, specs, pics etc)

F/A-18 Hornet Project
(Collection of F/A-18 pics)

F/A-18 Hornet
(Boeing photo gallery for F/A-18)

F/A-18E/F Super Hornet
(Defence Technology features of the F/A-18E/F)

U.S. Navy F/A-18 Hornet Wallpaper
(Good quality F/A-18 pics)

McDonnell Douglas
(Military Aviation Photo Gallery – lots of good F/A-18 pics)

Airliners.net
(Lots of “McDonnell Douglas F/A-18” photos)

Airliners.net
(Lots of “Boeing F/A-18” photos)

McDonnell Douglas/Boeing F/A-18 Hornet
(Index page for detailed profile of the F/A-18)

F/A-18 Hornet
(Global Security – good overview of the F/A-18)

Boeing F-18 Hornet
(Links to F/A-18 operators around the world + unofficial information sites)

AXLs Plane Gallery
(Several pages of F/A-18 photos)

F/A-18 Hornet
(Comprehensive and up-to-date profile of the F/A-18)

Shop

Flight Simulator Models:
To be added.

Scale Models:
To be added.

Scale Drawings:
See Daco Publications listed above.

Videos:

‘Sea Wings – The F/A-18 Hornet’ [Order this video from Amazon UK]
DD Video, B00004CS0H, Catalogue Number: DD1225
* 50 minute documentary on the US Navy F/A-18.

Boeing F-15 Eagle

Aircraft Profile
F-15C 84-0021 from the 36th TFW 53 TFS at
Bitburg, Germany, seen at Fairford in 1991.
(photo, Anthony Noble)

Development

On 23rd December 1969 McDonnell Douglas was named winner of the “FX” contest to build a new air superiority fighter. There was no “XF-15” as the aircraft was ordered straight “off the drawing board”. The most unusual part of the Eagle development was the use of 3/8th scale glider models which were launched from a NASA NB-52B at Dryden Flight Research Centre. During the flight test programme record attempts were carried out at Grand Forks AFB in North Dakota, these records included times to heights varying from 3,000 meters to 30,000 meters.

The first F-15A was rolled out on 26th June 1972, and its maiden flight was the following month on 27th July 1972. The first two-seater version flew on 7th July 1973. The first of 729 production F-15s flew on 25th November 1974, one in seven being a two-seater. Operational capability was reached in July 1975. By 1986 the USAF had nine F-15 squadrons in mainland USA, four in Europe, and three in the Pacific. The F-15A and B have been sold to Israel under the “Peace Fox” programme, the first of 51 aircraft being delivered in 1976. The JASDF (Japanese Air Self Defense Force) took delivery of 88 F-15Js beginning in July 1980 under the “Peace Eagle” programme. Another customer for the F-15 was Saudi Arabia, they took delivery of 62 F-15Cs and Ds between 1982 and 1984 plus two extras for reserves.

The F-15B is the two-seat training version of the F-15A, appart from the second seat and some minor internal changes the A and B versions have the same performance characteristics.

On 26th February 1979 the first F-15C flew, and deliveries began in mid 1980. The F-15C is externally identical to the ‘A’ model when not carrying the FAST (Fuel And Sensor Tactical) packs. These packs are now referred to as Conformal Fuel Tanks (CFT). Internally the F-15C has additional wing leading edge tanks and additional tanks in the central fuselage, the extra weight of fuel raised the gross weight of the F-15C to over 68,000lb, so items such as breaks, tyres and wheels had to be strengthened. The AN/APG-63 radar was equipped with Programmable Signal Processor (PSP), this high speed computer controls the radar modes through its software, this allows switching between different modes. Some F-15Cs can carry up to 18 cluster bombs or 6 Mk.82 bombs and can release them at supersonic speeds.

The F-15 Multi-Stage Improvement Programme (MSIP) is a joint programme carried out by McDonnell Douglas and the USAF’s Warner Robins Logistics Centre in Georgia. Upgrades were incorporated into the production line and then retrofitted to earlier production aircraft. MSIP II is to upgrade the F-15C/D models, the main part of which is to fit APG-70 radar and the AIM-120 AMRAAM missile.

The F-15E Strike Eagle was a privately funded feasability study to adapt the basic F-15 to the air-to-ground role. The first modified demonstrator aircraft flew on 8th July 1980. It was equipped with a modified APG-63 radar that used synthetic aperture radar techniques and the back seat was fitted out for a weapons System Officer (WSO).

F-15C 80-0022 from the 36 TFW 22 TFS at Bitburg, Germany, seen at Alconbury in 1991. F-15C 80-0038 from the 57th FIS at Keflavik, Iceland, seen at Boscombe Down in 1992.
(All photos Anthony Noble)

Variants

Requirement Specification: FX
Manufacturers Designation: ?

Development History:
F-15A Initial single-seat version for USAF and Israel with F100-PW-100 engines and APG-63 radar. Note: Initial development aircraft designated F-15A not YF-15
F-15A/B MSIP Minor update to USAF aircraft fleet during the 1980s
TF-15A Initial designation for F-15B
F-15B First two-seater trainer version. Fully mission capable but without the F-15As AN/ALQ-135 ECM equipment
F-15A/B MSIP Upgrade to near F-15C/D standard for USAF aircraft during the 1990s, with APG-70 radar, new avionics and digital computers replacing the original analog computers
F-15C Improved single-seater for USAF with increased internal fuel, updated APG-63 radar and provision for CFTs (Conformal Fuel Tanks) along the sides of the intakes. Initial aircraft had F100-PW-100 engines, but most were delivered with F100-PW-220 standard engines.
F-15D Two-seat version of F-15C
F-15C/D MSIP Avionics upgrade for USAF aircraft with new APG-70 radar, cockpit displays, EW systems and digital computers.
F-15DJ Two-seat version of F-15D for Japan
TF-15A ‘Strike Eagle’ Second development TF-15A modified during 1982 for dedicated air-ground operations to potentially replace the F-111. Company funded demonstrator.
F-15E Production two-seater with dedicated all-weather ground attack capability. Features strengthened airframe, redesigned cockpit, improved avionics and (in later production and retrofit) uprated F100-PW-229 engines. Note: ‘Strike Eagle’ name not officially adopted by the USAF.
F-15I “Baz” (Eagle) Export version of F-15E for Israel with significant Israeli avionics fit
F-15J Single-seater for Japan based on F-15C with some local avionics
F-15S Export version of F-15E for Saudi Arabia with downgraded avionics and no provision for CFTs.
F-15F Proposed single-seat fighter version of F-15E for Saudi Arabia
F-15H Proposed export version of F-15E for Saudi Arabia with reduced sensor fit
F-15XP Initial generic designation for F-15F/H export versions of F-15E for Saudi Arabia
NF-15B “Agile Eagle” F-15B used for manoeuvre control research
F-15N “Sea Eagle” Proposed version for US Navy
F-15XX Proposed lightweight development of F-15C with improved avionics and systems, as a low cost alternative to the F-22 for the USAF. Abandoned in 1992.
RF-15 “Peak Eagle” Proposed dedicated reconnaissance version
F-15C “Wild Weasel” Proposed defence suppression version
F-15/PDF Planned conversion of F-15Cs to defence suppression role as Precision Direction Finder aircraft. Proposed for aircraft replaced by the F-22.
SMTD Eagle First F-15B development aircraft modified by NASA for flight control research. Fitted with canards and 2D thrust vectoring exhaust nozzels.

History

Key Dates:
1965    1965 USAF requests feasability studies for a new air superiority fighter, designated “FX”
September 1968    Feasability studies and Request for Proposals issued.
23rd December 1969    McDonnell Douglas named winner of the “FX” contest.
26th June 1972    Roll out of the first single-seater F-15A.
27th July 1972    F-15A maiden flight by company test pilot Irving Burrows.
7th July 1973    Maiden flight of first two-seater F-15B.
24th November 1974    First production F-15A flew.
July 1975    Operational capability declared.
9 January 1976    Delivery of first F-15A to USAF.
End of 1976    The first USAF wing fully equipped.
April 1977    F-15 first deployed in Western Europe by USAFE.
26th February 1979    Maiden flight of first F-15C.
27 June 1979    First combat kills with the Israeli AF.
September 1979    First delivery of F-15C to USAF.
24th February 1984    Production go-ahead for F-15E.
December 1984    Flight testing of F-15C MSIP-II commences.
11th December 1986    Maiden flight of F-15E prototype.
7th September 1988    First flight of SMTD research demonstrator.
1988    First F-15E delivered to the USAF.

Operators

Military Operators

U.S. Air Force (F-15A/B 7 wings & 6 ANG sqns, F-15C/D 9 wings, F-15E 5 wings)
Japanese Air Self Defence Force (7 Sqns. with 223 F-15J/F-15DJ)
Israeli Air Force (1 Sqn of F-15A/B, 1 Sqn F-15C/D, 1 Sqn F-15I)
Royal Saudi Air Force (4 Sqns. with F-15C/D, 1+ sqn F-15S)

Government Agencies

NASA F-15B, SMTD

Civilian Operators

None  

Specifications

Boeing F-15A Eagle
Crew: One (Two in F-15B)
Dimensions: Length 63 ft 9 in (19.43 m); Height 18 ft 5½ in (5.63 m); Wing Span 42 ft 9.75 in (13.05 m); Wing Area 608.00 sq ft (56.48 sq m)
Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-100 turbofans each rated at 14,760 lb st (65.26 kN) dry and 23,830 lb st (106.0 kN) with afterburning
Weights: Empty Equipped 28,600 lb (12,973 kg); Normal Take-off 41,500 lb (18,884 kg) on an interception mission with four AIM-7 Sparrows or 54,400 lb (24,675 kg) with three 600-US gal (2271 litre) drop tanks; Maximum Take-off 56,000 lb (25,401 kg)
Armament: M61A1 Vulcan rotary cannon in the starboard wing leading edge lip, outboard of the air intake. The gun is fed from a 940 round drum located in the central fuselage. Four AIM-9M Sidewinders carried on the sides of the wing pylons, two on each side. (This arrangement allows a drop tank or bombs to be carried at the same time). Four AIM-7M Sparrow semi-active radar homing missiles carried on attachment points on the lower outer edges of the air intake boxes, two each side – or four AIM-120 AMRAAM on MSIP aircraft. The AMRAAM (Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile) is a “fire and forget” weapon with an inertial guidance unit that can be updated from the aircraft if required. Although not normally used as a bomber the F-15 has a secondary air-to-ground capability. Up to 16,000 lb of bombs, fuel tanks and missiles can be carried. The F-15 can carry 18 500 lb bombs, six on each wing pylon and six on the fuselage centreline.
Performance: Maximum level speed 1,433 kts (1,650 mph, 2655 kph) ‘clean’ at 36,000 ft (10975 m); Economical cruising speed 495 kts (570 mph, 917 kph) at optimum altitude; Maximum rate of climb at sea level 50,000+ ft/min (15240 m/min); Service ceiling 60,000 ft (18,290 m); Absolute ceiling 100,000 ft (30,480 m); Ferry range with drop tanks 2,500 nm (2,878 mls, 4,631 km)
Boeing F-15C Eagle
As for F-15A except for the following:-
Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 turbofans each rated at 14,670 lb st (65.26 kN) dry and 23,830 lb st (106.0 kN) with afterburning
Weights: Empty Equipped 28,600 lb (12,973 kg); Normal Take-off 44,630 lb (20,244 kg) on an interception mission with four AIM-7 Sparrows or 58,700 lb (26,521 kg) with three 610-US gal (2309 litre) drop tanks; Maximum Take-off 68,000 lb (30,844 kg)
Performance: Ferry range with drop tanks 2,500 nm (2,879 mls, 4,633 km) without CFTs, or 3,100 nm (3,570 mls, 5745 km) with CFTs; Combat radius on an interception mission 1,061 nm (1,222 mls, 1967 km)
Boeing F-15E Eagle
As for F-15C except for the following:-
Crew: Two
Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 turbofans each rated at 17,800 lb st (79.18 kN) dry and 29,100 lb st (129.45 kN) with afterburning
Weights: Empty Equipped 31,700 lb (14,379 kg); Maximum Take-off 81,000 lb (36,741 kg)
Armament: M61A1 Vulcan rotary cannon in the starboard wing leading edge lip, outboard of the air intake. The gun is fed from a 512 round drum located in the central fuselage. Four AIM-9M Sidewinders carried on the sides of the wing pylons, two on each side. (This arrangement allows a drop tank or bombs to be carried at the same time). Up to 24,250 lb (11,000 kg) of bombs, fuel tanks and missiles can be carried on two wing pylons, underfuselage pylons and 12 bomb racks mounted directly on the CFTs. AIM-7 and AIM-120 air-to-air missiles can also be carried, as on the F-15C.

Production

Design Centre

Head of Design Team: George Graff
Programme Manager: Don Malvern
Design Office: McDonnell Douglas Corporation, St Louis, Missouri

Manufacture

McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Corporation (MCAir)
(Box 516, St Louis, MO 63166, USA. Later Boeing Military Aircraft)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-15A 355 St Louis, MO 1972-1979
F-15B 57 St Louis, MO 1972-1979
F-15C 118 St Louis, MO 1979-1985
F-15D 31 St Louis, MO 1979-1985
F-15J 2 St Louis, MO 1979-1980
F-15DJ 12 St Louis, MO 1979-1981
F-15E 209 St Louis, MO 1985-1991
F-15I 26 St Louis, MO 1996-1998
F-15S 72 St Louis, MO 1996-1998
F-15E 10 St Louis, MO 1998-2002
Total: 894    
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd
(5-1, Marunouchi 2-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan)
Version Quantity Assembly Location Time Period
F-15J 173* Tokyo 1981-1997
Total: 173    

* First 8 a/c assembled from St Louis components. Subsequently, Mitsubishi responsible for forward and centre fuselage, Kawasaki making wings and tails.

Total Produced: 1067 a/c

Production List:

F-15 Eagle – Scramble Special
by Jurgen van Toor
Published by Dutch Aviation Society, 2003 ISBN: ?
* A5 size paperback containing history, operators and an extensive production list.

More Information

Books

‘F-15 Eagle and Strike Eagle – Combat Legends 6’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Steve Davies
Published by Airlife Publishing Ltd, 1 Oct 2002 ISBN: 1840373776
* Concise overview of the F-15 with good illustrations

‘F-15 Eagle in Color’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Peter R Foster
Published by Plymouth Press Ltd, 1 Apr 1998 ISBN: 1882663225
* All-colour pictorial history of the F-15.

‘McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle – Super Heavy-Weight Fighter’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Robert S Hopkins
Published by Midland Publishing, May 1998 ISBN: 1857800818
* Aerofax series. Excellent development history and service use

‘F-15 Eagle Walkaround’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Lou Drendel
Published by Squadron/Signal Publications, Nov 2001 ISBN: 0897474333
* Detailed close-up photos of the F-15

‘USAF F-15 Eagles – Units, Colors & Markings’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Don R Logan
Published by Schiffer Publishing, 9 Apr 2000 ISBN: 0764310607
* Very detailed coverage of USAF F-15 operators

‘McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Peter E Davies & Anthony M Thornborough
Published by Crowood Press, 1 Aug 2001 ISBN: 1861263430
* Includes development history, service career and combat use

‘F-15 Eagle in Action – Aircraft Number 183’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Al Adcock
Published by Squadron/Signal Publications, 200? ISBN: 0897474457
* Up-to-date heavily illustrated history of the F-15

‘F-15C/E Eagle Units of Operation Iraqi Freedom – Osprey Combat Aircraft 47’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Steve Davies
Published by Osprey Publishing, 2004 ISBN: 1-84176-802-2
* Very well illustrated look at F-15 operations over Iraq

‘McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle – Warbird Tech Vol 9’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
by Dennis R Jenkins
Published by Speciality Press, May 1997 ISBN: 0933424728
* Detailed look at the F-15 using excerpts from official technical manuals

‘World Air Power Journal, Volume 9’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by Aerospace Publishing Ltd, Nov 1990 ISBN: 1 87402 3174
* Includes ‘Focus Aircraft’ feature on the F-15 Eagle.

‘World Air Power Journal, Volume 21’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by Aerospace Publishing Ltd, Nov 1990 ISBN: 1 87402 3603
* Includes ‘Focus Aircraft’ feature on the F-15E ‘Strike Eagle’.

‘World Air Power Journal, Volume 33’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by Aerospace Publishing Ltd, Nov 1990 ISBN: 1 86184 015 2
* Includes ‘Variant Briefing’ feature on the F-15 Eagle.

‘International Air Power Review, Volume 7’ [Order this book from Amazon UK]
Published by AIRtime Publishing Ltd, April 2003 ISBN: 1 880588 48 X
* Includes ‘Focus Aircraft’ feature on the latest developments and combat actions of the F-15 Eagle.

Magazines

To be added.

Links

Milavia – F-15 Eagle
(History, specifications, photo gallery, links, books)

F-15 Eagle
(Boeing Military Aircraft official website – backgrond, specs, news, photos)

Boeing F-15 Eagle
(Airliners.net: Four pages of excellent photos)

McDD F-15 Eagle
(Serial number info and photos)

Boeing F-15 Eagle Image Gallery
(1 page of photos)

F-15 Eagle
(Good profile covering history, variants, specs etc)

F-15 Eagle
(Concise profile of the F-15)

F-15E Strike Eagle.com
(Very detailed coverage of the USAF F-15E)

How an F-15 works
(How Stuff Works – simple explanations of F-15 design features)

The F-15 Eagle: A Chronology
(Timeline 1965-2002 of key events in F-15 history)

F-15 Eagle
(History, variants, exports, specs, photos, links)

Boeing F-15 Eagle
(Official F-15A & F-15E Flight Manuals on CD-ROM)

Eagle Power
(Information, operators, patches, links, CD-ROM)

F-15 Eagle’s first flight 30 years past
(Edwards AFB feature)

Air Force Technology – F-15E Strike Eagle
(Technical details for F-15E weapons and equipment)

McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle
(Airliners.net: 46 pages of excellent F-15 photos)

The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle
(Comprehensive profile updated to 2003)

USAF Museum – McDonnell Douglas F-15 ‘Streak Eagle’
(Brief notes plus photo gallery)

McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle
(Detailed profile covering all versions of the F-15)

USAF Museum – McDonnell Douglas F-15A ‘Eagle’
(Brief notes on production and exports plus photo gallery)

McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle
(Colour profile drawings for five USAF F-15s)

Shop

Flight Simulator Models:
To be added.

Scale Models:
To be added.

Scale Drawings:
‘F-15C/D Eagle – Lock-On No.4’
by Francois Verlinden
Published by Verlinden Productions Inc, June 1989 ISBN: 9 0709 321 21
* Features close-up colour photographs of external and inernal details plus scale drawings.

‘F-15 Eagle in Detail and Scale – Detail And Scale Vol.14’
by Bert Kinzey
Published by Aero Publishers Inc, 1984 ISBN: ?
* B+W photographs of external and inernal details plus several pages of scale drawings for all variants.

Videos:

‘Modern Military Aircraft: F-15 Eagle’ [Order this DVD from Amazon UK]
* DVD which takes you into the cockpit of the F-15

‘Great Planes: McDonnell-Douglas F-15 Eagle’
* DVD documentary on the history of the F-15