Key Dates

of the French Air Force
August 1933    French Air Force (Armee de l’Air) formed
2 July 1934    French Air Force independent of the Army
May 1940    Start of the Battle of France
22 June 1940    French Air Force grounded following surrender
3 July 1940    Vichy Air Force formed under German control
August 1940    Free French Air Force formed by the Allies
1 September 1942    French-manned Normandie-Niemen Fighter Regiment formed in USSR
1 December 1942    Germany disbands the Vichy Air Force
May 1945    Former Vichy and Free French air arms merged to reform the Armee de l’Air
1948    First operational jet aircraft delivered – Vampire
1951    First helicopters received – Alouette I



[To be rewritten].

Narrative History

of the French Air Force

December 1909 Army officers begin flying training at civilian schools. March 1910 Etablissement Militaire d’Aviation created to conduct experiments with aircraft. April 1910 formation of Service Aeronautique, a separate air command comprising EMA and balloon companies. October 1910 Aviation Militaire formed as branch of the Army. Massive expansion of AM during First World War. 27 April 1925 start of air policing operations in Morocco (continue until December 1934). 7 December 1928 Air Ministry created. August 1933 AM renamed Armee de l’Air. 2 July 1934 AdlA becomes independent service. 3 July 1940 Vichy Air Force formed under German control. August 1940 Free French Air Force formed : Forces Aeriennes Francaises Libres. 1945 Armee de l’Air reformed from Free French and ex-Vichy units.

[To be rewritten].

Current Order of Battle

of the French Air Force
Unit Type Base
EC 01.002 ‘Cigogne’ Mirage 2000-5F Luxeuil
ET 02.002 ‘Côte d’Or’ Alpha Jet Dijon/Longvic
EC 03.002 ‘Alsace’ Rafale Avord
EC 01.003 ‘Navarre’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
EC 02.003 ‘Champagne’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
EC 03.003 ‘Ardennes’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
EC 02.004 ‘La Fayette’ Rafale Istres
EIV 03.004 ‘Limousin’ Alpha Jet Tours
EC 02.005 ‘Ile de France’ Mirage 2000B/C Orange/Caritat
EIV 03.005 ‘Comtat Venaissin’ TB.10 Salon de Provence
EC 01.007 ‘Provence’ Rafale St Dizier
ET 02.007 ‘Argonne’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
ETO 01.008 ‘Saintonge’ Alpha Jet Cazaux
ETO 02.008 ‘Nice’ Alpha Jet (Belgian) Cazaux
EFIP 01.011 ‘Roussillon’ TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EC 03.011 ‘Corse’ Mirage 2000-5 Djibouti-Ambouli
EIV 02.012 ‘Picardie’ TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EIV 01.013 ‘Artois’ TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EIV 03.013 ‘Auverge’ Alpha Jet Tours
EC 02.030 ‘Normandie-Niémen’ Rafale Mont de Marsan
EC 03.030 ‘Lorraine’ Mirage 2000-5F, Rafale Al Dhafra, UAE
ED 01.033 ‘Belfort’ Harfang UAV Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
ER 02.033 ‘Savoie’ Mirage F.1CR Mont de Marsan
EDCA 00.036 Boeing E-3F Avord
ETM 01.040 ‘Moselle’ TBM.700, AS 555N Dijon
ETE 00.042 ‘Ventoux’ CN.235, DHC-6 Mont de Marsan
ETE 00.043 ‘Médoc’ TBM.700 Bordeaux/Mérignac
ETE 00.044 ‘Mistral’ TBM.700 Salon de Provence
EH 01.044 ‘Solenzara’ SA 330B, AS 332 Solenzara
ETOM 00.050 ‘Réunion’ AS 555AN, CN.235 St. Denis/Gillot
ETOM 00.052 ‘La Tontouta’ AS 555AN, SA 330B, CN.235M Nouméa/La Tontouta
EEA 01.054 ‘Dunkerque’ C-160G Gabriel Evreux/Fauville
GAM 00.056 ‘Vaucluse’ DHC-6, AS 532UL Evreux/Fauville
ET 03.060 ‘Esterel’ A310, A340 Roissy-CDG (Paris)
ET 01.061 ‘Touraine’ A400M Orleans/Bricy
ET 02.061 ‘Franche-Comté’ C-130H, C-130H-30 Orleans/Bricy
ET 03.061 ‘Poitou’ C-160R Orleans/Bricy
ET 01.062 ‘Vercors’ CN.235 Creil/Senlis
ET 03.062 ‘Ventoux’ CN.235, DHC-6 Creil/Senlis
ET 01.064 ‘Béarn’ A400M Evreux/Fauville
ET 02.064 ‘Anjou’ C-160R Evreux/Fauville
ETEC 00.065 ‘Rambouillet’ Falcon 7X/2000, TBM.700, A330 Villacoublay/Velizy, Orly
EH 01.067 ‘Pyrénées’ SA 330B, EC725 Cazaux
EH 03.067 ‘Parisis’ AS 555AN, AS 532UL Villacoublay
EH 05.067 ‘Alpilles’ AS 555AN Orange
ETOM 00.068 ‘Guyane’ SA 330, AS 555AN, DHC-6, CN235 Kourou
EDC 00.070 ‘Chateaudun’ TBM.700 Chateaudun
ETOM 00.082 ‘Maine’ AS 332, CN.235 Tahiti-Faaa
ETOM 00.088 ‘Larzac’ AS 555AN, SA 330B, CN235 Djibouti/Ambouli
EC 01.091 ‘Gascogne’ Rafale St Dizier
GRV 02.091 ‘Bretagne’ C-135FR Istres/Le Tubé
ET 02.092 ‘Acquitaine’ Rafale St Dizier
EFNC 01.093 ‘Aunis’ D.140E Salon de Provence
EIV 02.093 ‘Cevennes’ TB.10 Salon de Provence
EPAA 20.300 Alpha Jet, Extra EA330 Salon de Provence
GI 00.312 Alpha Jet*, CAP.10B, CAP.231,
CAP.232, Jodel D.140, Tucano, Epsilon + gliders
Salon de Provence
EPAA 02.312* Alpha Jet Salon de Provence
CIAM 06.312 Jodel D.140R, gliders Salon de Provence
SAVV Jodel D.140E/R Salon de Provence
EVAA CAP.10B Salon de Provence
EAC 01.314 ‘Jean Langlet’ Alpha Jet Tours/St. Symphorien
EAC 02.314 ‘Henri Jeandet’ Alpha Jet Tours/St. Symphorien
EAC 06.314 ‘Jean Maridor’ Alpha Jet Tours/St. Symphorien
EPAA 00.315 TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EAT 00.319 EMB-121 Xingu Avord
CI 00.321 GI Airframes Rochefort-St Agnant
DSA 03.321 GI Airframes Rochefort-St Agnant
CFIP 00.322 TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
CEAM 00.330 various Mont-de-Marsan
EC 05.330 ‘Cote d’Argent’ Mirage 2000, Alpha Jet Mont-de-Marsan
CVVA 21.535 Jodel D.140R + gliders Romarantin
CMP 22.535 Jodel D.140R + gliders Amberieu
CMP 25.535 Jodel D.140R + gliders Saintes

* = ‘Le Patrouille de France’

Historical Order of Battle for 2008

of the French Air Force
Unit Type Base
BA 126/SAVV 23.535 Jodel D.140R + gliders Solenzara
BA 273/SAVV 21.535 Jodel D.140E/R + gliders Romarantin
BA 278/SAVV 22.535 Jodel D.140E/R + gliders Amberieu
BA 722/SAVV 25.535 Jodel D.140E/R + gliders Saintes
BA 749/SAVV 24.535 Jodel D.140R + gliders Grenoble
EC 01.002 ‘Cigogne’ Mirage 2000-5F, Alpha Jet Dijon/Longvic
EC 02.002 ‘Côte d’Or’ Mirage 2000-5 Dijon/Longvic
EC 01.003 ‘Navarre’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
EC 02.003 ‘Champagne’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
EC 03.003 ‘Ardennes’ Mirage 2000D Nancy/Ochey
EC 01.004 ‘Dauphiné’ Mirage 2000N Luxeuil/St. Sauveur
EC 02.004 ‘Lafayette’ Mirage 2000N Luxeuil/St. Sauveur
EC 03.004 ‘Limousin’ Mirage 2000N Istres/Le Tube
EC 01.005 ‘Vendée’ Mirage 2000B/C Orange/Caritat
EC 02.005 ‘Ile de France’ Mirage 2000B/C Orange/Caritat
ETO 01.008 ‘Saintonge’ Alpha Jet Cazaux
ETO 02.008 ‘Nice’ Alpha Jet Cazaux
EC 01.012 ‘Cambrésis’ Mirage 2000B/C Cambrai/Epinoy
EC 02.012 ‘Picardie’ Mirage 2000B/C Cambrai/Epinoy
EC 01.030 ‘Alsace’ Mirage F.1CT Colmar/Meyenheim
EC 02.030 ‘Normandie-Niémen’ Mirage F.1CT Colmar/Meyenheim
ER 01.033 ‘Belfort’ Mirage F.1CR Reims/Champagne
ER 02.033 ‘Savoie’ Mirage F.1CR Reims/Champagne
EC 03.033 ‘Lorraine’ Mirage F.1B/CT Reims/Champagne
EC 04.033 ‘Vexin’ Mirage 2000C/D Djibouti
EDCA 00.036 Boeing E-3F Avord
ETM 01.040 ‘Moselle’ AS 555N, TBM.700 Metz/Frescaty
ETE 00.042 ‘Ventoux’ CN.235, DHC-6 Mont de Marsan
ETE 00.043 ‘Médoc’ TBM.700, AS 355F1 Bordeaux/Mérignac
ETE 00.044 ‘Mistral’ TBM.700 Salon de Provence
ETOM 00.050 ‘Réunion’ AS 555AN, C-160R St. Denis/Gillot
ETOM 00.052 ‘La Tontouta’ AS 555AN, SA 330B, CN.235M Nouméa/La Tontouta
EET 01.054 ‘Dunkerque’ C-160G Gabriel Metz/Frescaty
ETOM 00.055 ‘Ouessant’ AS 355AN, C-160R Dakar/Ouakam
GAM 00.056 ‘Vaucluse’ DHC-6, AS 532UL Evreux/Fauville
ETOM 00.058 ‘Guadeloupe’ SA 330, CN.235 Pointe-à-Pitre & Fort de France
ET 03.060 ‘Esterel’ A310 Roissy-CDG (Paris)
ET 01.061 ‘Touraine’ C-160R Orleans/Bricy
ET 02.061 ‘Franche-Comté’ C-130H, C-130H-30 Orleans/Bricy
ET 03.061 ‘Poitou’ C-160R Orleans/Bricy
ET 01.062 ‘Vercors’ CN.235 Creil/Senlis
ET 01.064 ‘Béarn’ C-160R Evreux/Fauville
ET 02.064 ‘Anjou’ C-160R Evreux/Fauville
ETEC 00.065 ‘Rambouillet’ Falcon 50/900, TBM.700, A319 Villacoublay/Velizy, Orly
EH 01.067 ‘Pyrénées’ SA 330B Cazaux
EH 03.067 ‘Parisis’ AS 555AN Villacoublay
EH 05.067 ‘Alpilles’ SA 330B, AS 332, AS 555AN Istres
EH 06.067 ‘Solenzara’ SA 330B Solenzara
EHOM 00.068 ‘Guyane’ SA 330, AS 555AN Kourou
EDC 00.070 ‘Chateaudun’ TBM.700 Chateaudun
ETOM 00.082 ‘Maine’ AS 332, CN.235 Tahiti-Faaa
ETOM 00.088 ‘Larzac’ AS 555AN, C-160R Djibouti/Ambouli
ERS 01.091 ‘Gascogne’ Alpha Jet Mont-de-Marsan
GRV 00.093 ‘Bretagne’ C-135FR Istres/Le Tubé
GI 00.312 Alpha Jet*, CAP.10B, CAP.231,
CAP.232, Jodel D.140, Tucano, Epsilon + gliders
Salon de Provence
EPAA 02.312* Alpha Jet Salon de Provence
SAVV Jodel D.140E/R Salon de Provence
EVAA CAP.10B Salon de Provence
EAC 01.314 ‘Jean Langlet’ Alpha Jet Tours/St. Symphorien
EAC 02.314 ‘Henri Jeandet’ Alpha Jet Tours/St. Symphorien
EAC 06.314 ‘Jean Maridor’ Alpha Jet Tours/St. Symphorien
EPAA 00.315 TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EPAA 01.315 TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EPAA 02.315 TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
EAT 00.319 EMB-121 Xingu Avord
CFIP 00.322 TB.30 Epsilon Cognac/Chateau-Bernard
CEAM 00.330 various Mont-de-Marsan
EC 05.330 ‘Cote d’Argent’ Mirage F.1/2000, Alpha Jet Mont-de-Marsan
ETE 06.330 ‘Albret’ DHC-6, TBM.700 Mont-de-Marsan
EC 85.330 Mirage 2000-5 Mont-de-Marsan
EMD 56.330 Hunter UAV Mont-de-Marsan
CITac 00.339 ‘Aquitaine’ Falcon 20, Jaguar E Luxeuil/St. Sauveur
CIET 00.340 C-160R, CN.235 Toulouse/Francazal
CIEH 00.341 ‘Maurienne’ AS 555AN, SA 330 Puma Toulouse/Francazal

* = ‘Le Patrouille de France’

Free French Naval Aviation

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The Free French Naval Aviation (FNFL) was first established in Britain in June 1940, just as the Government in France was preparing to sign an armistice with Germany. After its invasion in May 1940, the German Army now occupied a large part of northern France. Despite this, the Free French Forces under General de Gaulle vowed to fight on, and the Free French Air Force and Free French Navy were its main means of resistance. With British help, the first Free French squadron was established in November 1941. 340 Squadron Royal Air Force was manned by exiled French personnel, a large number of which were ex-Aeronavale pilots. Unfortunately, French military forces in the French colonies chose to remain loyal to the semi-Fascist puppet government in Vichy, rather than join the fight to free France from occupation. This meant that on occaision French forces fought French forces.

America’s entry into the war speeded up the expansion of the FNFL considerably, with many new units being formed on US equipment from 1942 onwards. In November 1942 French Forces were strong enough to be able to participate in Operation Torch, the invasion of French North Africa. Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia were soon liberated and the FNFL later moved its headquarters to Algiers. Another consequence was that other colonies began to side with the Free French, and many more recruits began to arrive to join the fight. In 1943 RAF Coastal Command was able to form two new squadrons composed entirely of ex-Aeronavale personnel.

In September 1943 FNFL forces were strongly represented in the liberation of Corsica. June 1944 saw the Allied invasion of Normandy, and FNFL units were eventually able to operate on home soil for the first time. Operation Dragoon saw the Allied invasion of Southern France in August 1944. Here, FNFL units soon joined up with Forces Francaises de l’Interieur (FFI) units comprised of ex-air force and navy resistance members flying captured aircraft. Several of these spontaneously created squadrons were formed in Southern France. FNFL/FFI units performed very effectively in driving the Germans back, thus speeding the liberation of France. By May 1945, the job had been done, and all FNFL/FFI units were transferred to official Aeronavale (French Naval Aviation) control.

Key Dates

29 August 1940    First Free French flying unit formed.
1942    Many new units formed with aircraft supplied by the USA.
November 1942    Operation Torch – liberation of French North Africa.
September 1943    FNFL units participate in liberation of Corsica.
August 1944    First FNFL units move to metropolitan France.
August 1944    Indigenous FFI units join with the FNFL.
8 May 1945    Free French Naval Aviation becomes the official Naval air force of France.

Current Status

The Free French Navy was merged into the official French armed forces in May 1945.

Future Plans

Not applicable.

Markings

Special Markings

FNFL aircraft operated in a wide varienty of colour schemes. The overall camouflage scheme was usually as specified by the original operator: Aeronavale, RAF or US Navy. FNFL were distinguished by the use of the Cross of Lorraine (a cross with two horizontal bars) on a white disc. This marking was displayed on the fuselage sides in place of the normal French roundel, and sometimes also on the wings. By 1945 this marking was little used, as the Vichy French Navy had been disbanded, thus removing any possible source of confusion.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

FNFL aircraft retained the serial number of the original operator. Ex-French aircraft kept the their Aeronavale numbering, while aircraft supplied by the RAF and US Navy used their own serials, e.g. Sunderland DV985.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used

Current Aircraft Inventory

Not applicable.

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

False reports of aircraft on order or in service

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Aéronavale Française Libre, Forces Navales Françaises Libres, Algiers, French Algeria.

Organisational Structure

The FNFL was composed of units manned by French personnel but logistically supported by one of the main Allied air forces, the RAF or US Navy. As such, many units had dual designations, e.g. 343 Squadron RAF was also Flotille 7FE. The French Navy practice of classifying units as Flotilles or Escadrilles was retained by the FNFL.

Current Order of Battle

Not applicable

Historical Orders of Battle

Historical Order of Battle for May 1945

All-Time Flying Units List

List of Flying Units

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

Not applicable.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

To be added.

More Information

Books

French Military Aviation by Paul A Jackson (Midland Counties, 1979)

Magazines

No feature articles known.

Websites

wikipedia: Free French Naval Forces
wikipedia: Free French Naval Air Service

Any further photographs illustrating this air arm would be welcome.

Historical Order of Battle for May 1945

of the Free French Navy
Unit Type Base
Escadrille 1S MS.500 & MS.502 ?
Escadrille 2S Latecoere 298 ?
Escadrille 3S Latecoere 298 ?
Escadrille 4S Supermarine Walrus ?
Escadrille 5S Latecoere 298 ?
Escadrille 10S Ju 52, Ju 88, Ju 188, MS.500, Bf 108 ?
Flotille 2FE Wellington, Hudson III ?
Flotille 6FE PBY-5A Catalina ?
Flotille 7FE Sunderland ?
Flotille 9FE Dornier Do 24 ?
Groupe Aeronaval No.2
Flotille 3FB SBD-5 Cognac
Flotille 4FB SBD-5 Cognac

All-Time Units Listing

of the Free French Navy

This page lists all the aviation units of the Free French Navy, since its formation.

Royal Air Force Parented Units
343 Squadron ‘Artois’ (Aeronavale 7F)
344 Squadron ‘Picardie’ (Aeronavale 7F)

French Parented Units
Escadrille 1AC
Escadrille 2AC
Escadrille 1S
Escadrille 2S
Escadrille 3S
Escadrille 4S
Escadrille 5S
Escadrille 10S
Escadrille 8S5

Flotille 1FC
Flotille 2FE
Flotille 6FE
Flotille 9FE

US Navy Parented Units
Flotille 3FB
Flottile 4FB
Groupe Aeronavale No.2

All-Time Aircraft Used List
Free French Naval Aviation

Aircraft Type Quantity Service Entry Out of Service Origin
Boulton Paul Defiant 1 1943 1944 RAF
Breguet 521 Bizerte ? 1940 1945 Aeronavale
CAMS 55.10 ? 1940 1945 Aeronavale
Consolidated PBY-5A Catalina 8 1943 1945 USA
Dewoitine D.520 ? 1942 1944 Aeronavale
Dornier Do 24T-2 ? 1944 1945 captured?
Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless 32 1944 1945 USA
Hawker Hurricane IIC 2 1944 1945 UK
Junkers Ju 52/3m ? 1944 1945 captured
Junkers Ju 88A-4 7 1944 1945 captured
Junkers Ju 188 ? 1944 1945 captured
Latecoere 298 ? 1940 1945 Aeronavale
Latecoere 611 1 1940 1945 Aeronavale
Liore et Olivier LeO H-47 ? 1940 1945 Aeronavale
Loire 130M ? 1940 1945 Aeronavale
Lockheed Hudson III 4 1944 1945 RAF
Lockheed PV-1 Ventura ? 1944 1945 USA
Martin 167F Maryland ? 1940 1945 Aeronavale
Messerschmit Bf 108 ? 1944 1945 captured
Morane-Saulnier MS.500 Criquet ? 1944 1945 captured
Morane-Saulnier MS.502 Criquet ? 1944 1945 captured
Mureaux-Besson MB.411 ? 1940 1944 Aeronavale
Potez-CAMS 141 ? 1940 1944 Aeronavale
Short Sunderland III 33 1944 1945 UK
Superarine Walrus 33 1944 1945 UK
Vickers Wellington ? 1943 1945 RAF

Additional information is welcome

Free French Air Force

Operator Profile

History

Narrative Summary

The Free French Air Force (FAFL) was first established in Britain in June 1940, just as the Government in France was preparing to sign an armistice with Germany. After its invasion in May 1940, the German Army now occupied a large part of northern France. Despite this, the Free French Forces under General de Gaulle vowed to fight on, and the Free French Air Force and Free French Navy were its main means of resistance. With British help, the first flying unit of the FAFL, a mixed roles unit, was established in August 1940. The following year a full squadron manned by exiled French personnel was formed, 340 Squadron Royal Air Force. Another 11 squadrons later followed. Unfortunately, French military forces in the French colonies chose to remain loyal to the semi-Fascist puppet government in Vichy, rather than join the fight to free France from occupation. This meant that on occaision French forces fought French forces.

America’s entry into the war speeded up the expansion of the FAFL considerably, with many new units being formed on US equipment from 1942 onwards. In November 1942 French Forces were strong enough to be able to participate in Operation Torch, the invasion of French North Africa. Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia were soon liberated and the FAFL later moved its headquarters to Algiers. Another consequence was that other colonies began to side with the Free French, and many more recruits began to arrive to join the fight.

In September 1943 FAFL forces were strongly represented in the liberation of Corsica. June 1944 saw the Allied invasion of Normandy, and within a few weeks, FAFL units were able to operate on home soil for the first time. Operation Dragoon saw the Allied invasion of Southern France in August 1944. Here, FAFL units soon joined up with Forces Francaises de l’Interieur (FFI) units comprised of ex-air force resistance members flying captured aircraft. Several of these spontaneously created squadrons were formed in Southern France. FAFL/FFI units performed very effectively in driving the Germans back, thus speeding the liberation of France. By May 1945, the job had been done, and all FAFL/FFI units were transferred to official Armee de L’Air (French Air Force) control. The names and traditions of these units still survive with the modern French Air Force.

Key Dates

17 June 1940    Free French Air Force first established.
29 August 1940    First flying unit formed.
1942    Many new units formed with aircraft supplied by the USA.
November 1942    FAFL units participate in Operation Torch.
September 1943    FAFL units participate in liberation of Corsica.
July 1944    First FAFL units move to metropolitan France.
August 1944    Indigenous FFI units join with the FAFL.
8 May 1945    Free French Air Force becomes the official air force of France.

Current Status

In May 1945 the FAFL became the official French Air Force – the Armee de l’Air.

Future Plans

Not applicable.

Markings

Special Markings

FAFL aircraft operated in a wide varienty of colour schemes. The overall camouflage scheme was usually as specified by the original operator : AdlA, RAF, VVS or USAAF. FAFL were distinguished by the use of the Cross of Lorraine (a cross with two horizontal bars) on a white disc. This marking was displayed on the fuselage sides in place of the normal French roundel, and sometimes also on the wings. By 1945 this marking was little used, as the Vichy Air Force had been disbanded, thus removing any possible source of confusion.

Aircraft Serial Numbers

FAFL aircraft retained the serial number of the original operator. Ex-French aircraft kept the their AdlA numbering, while aircraft supplied by the RAF and USAAF used their own serials, e.g. Baltimore FW565.

Unit/Base Codes

Coding system not used

Aircraft

Aircraft Designations

None – Manufacturers designations used

Current Aircraft Inventory

Not applicable

All-Time Aircraft Used List

All-Time Table of Aircraft Used

Aircraft NOT Used

False reports of aircraft on order or in service

Organisation

Main Headquarters

Forces Aériennes Françaises Libres, Algiers, French Algeria.

Organisational Structure

The FAFL was composed of units manned by French personnel but logistically supported by one of the main Allied air forces, the RAF, USAAF or VVS. As such, many units had dual designations, e.g. 340 Squadron RAF was also Groupement de Chasse IV/2. The French AdlA WW2 practice of forming Groupements (Wings) from 2, 3 or 4 Escadrilles (Squadrons) was also used by the FAFL.

Current Order of Battle

Not applicable

Historical Orders of Battle

Historical Order of Battle for May 1945

All-Time Flying Units List

List of Flying Units

Air Bases

Current Air Bases

Not applicable.

All-Time Air Bases Used List

To be added.

More Information

Books

French Military Aviation by Paul A Jackson (Midland Counties, 1979)

Magazines

To be added.

Websites

wikipedia; Free French Air Force
FAFL Units
Table of FAFL units

Any further photographs illustrating this air arm would be welcome.